Dymoke History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Dymoke is one of the thousands of new names that the Norman Conquest brought to England in 1066. The Dymoke family lived in Gloucestershire. The name is derived from the local of Dymock, a village in this county.

Dymock was the home of the Dymock poets (1911 to 1914) that included Robert Frost, Lascelles Abercrombie, Rupert Brooke, Edward Thomas, Wilfrid Wilson Gibson, and John Drinkwater. The homes of Robert Frost and Wilfrid Wilson Gibson can still be seen there today. It is thought that the family first lived at Knight's Green, an area just outside of the village of Dymock. A reference in 1848 listed the village as having 1776 inhabitants, but today there are fewer than 300. [1]

Early Origins of the Dymoke family

The surname Dymoke was first found in Gloucestershire where the village and parish of Dymock dates back to before the Norman Conquest. According to the Domesday Book, Dymock was held by King Edward at that time and was part of the Botloe hundred. It goes on to mention that King William held it in demesne for 4 years and after that, Earl William held it followed by his son Roger. It was sizable as there was land there for 41 ploughs and a priest held another 12 acres at the time. [2]

Today the village comprises over 7,000 acres. The name Dymock was possibly derived from the Celtic word "din" which meant "fort" [3]

Another reference claims that name was derived from the Saxon words "dim" for dark, + "ac" for oak, in other words "dark oak." [1] Remains can still be seen of an ancient hall in Howell, Lincolnshire, the seat of the Dymoke family at one time. [1]

One of the first on record was Roger Dymock (fl. 1395), an early English theologian who studied at Oxford, and there proceeded to the degree of doctor in divinity. [4]

Sir John Dymoke (d. 1381), was the Kng's Champion, or Champion of England, "whose functions were confined to the performance of certain ceremonial duties at coronations, is stated to have been the son of John Dymoke, by his wife, Felicia Harevill. The family has been variously traced to the village of the name in Gloucestershire and to the Welsh borders near Herefordshire. The importance of Sir John and of his descendants was due to his marriage with Margaret (b. 1325), daughter of Thomas de Ludlow (b. 1300). " [4]

Early History of the Dymoke family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dymoke research. Another 101 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1350, 1381, 1500, 1566, 1531, 1580, 1428, 1471, 1469, 1471 and 1546 are included under the topic Early Dymoke History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dymoke Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Dymoke are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Dymoke include Dymoke, Dymock, Dimock, Dimoke and others.

Early Notables of the Dymoke family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir John Dymoke (died 1381), held the manor of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire; Margaret Dymoke (ca.1500-?), of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire, lady-in-waiting at the court of Henry VIII of England; Sir Edward Dymoke, of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire (d. 1566), Hereditary King's Champion; Robert Dymoke, Dymock or Dymocke, of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire (1531-1580), Queen's Champion of England; and Sir...
Another 60 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Dymoke Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Dymoke migration to the United States +

Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Dymoke, or a variant listed above:

Dymoke Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Thomas Dymoke, who arrived in Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1635 [5]

Contemporary Notables of the name Dymoke (post 1700) +

  • John Dymoke (1804-1873), Rector of Scrivelsby
  • Henry Dymoke (1801-1865), British landowner, Champion at the coronation of King George IV, High Sheriff of Lincolnshire in 1833
  • Major John Lindley Marmion Dymoke MBE (b. 1926), 33rd Baron of Scrivelsby, 7th Baron of Tetford
  • Charles Dymoke Green, recipient of the Bronze Wolf, awarded by the World Scout Committee in 1981
  • Admiral Lionel Dymoke,


The Dymoke Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Pro Rege et lege Dimico
Motto Translation: Fight for King and Law.


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  4. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  5. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)


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