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Donelan History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Many variations of the name Donelan have evolved since the time of its initial creation. In Gaelic it appeared as O Domhnallain, derived from the personal name of Domhallan, Lord of Clan Breasail, from whom the sept claims descent.

Early Origins of the Donelan family


The surname Donelan was first found in Galway (Irish: Gaillimh) part of the province of Connacht, located on the west coast of the Island, where they held a family seat from ancient times.

Early History of the Donelan family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Donelan research.
Another 70 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1609, 1649, 1705, 1616, 1640, 1588, 1665 and 1660 are included under the topic Early Donelan History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Donelan Spelling Variations


The Middle Ages saw a great number of spelling variations for surnames common to the Irish landscape. One reason for these variations is the fact that surnames were not rigidly fixed by this period. The following variations for the name Donelan were encountered in the archives: Donellan, Donnellan, Donnelan, Donelan, Donnellin, Donellin and many more.

Early Notables of the Donelan family (pre 1700)


Prominent amongst the family at this time was Reverend Nehemiah Donellan (d. 1609), Archbishop of Tuam, who translated the New Testament into Irish. His first son was Nehemiah Donnellan (1649-1705), an Irish lawyer and judge and...
Another 35 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Donelan Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Donelan family to the New World and Oceana


In the 19th century, thousands of Irish left their English-occupied homeland for North America. Like most new world settlers, the Irish initially settled on the eastern shores of the continent but began to move westward with the promise of owning land. The height of this Irish migration came during the Great Potato Famine of the late 1840s. With apparently nothing to lose, Irish people left on ships bound for North America and Australia. Unfortunately a great many of these passengers lost their lives - the only thing many had left - to disease, starvation, and accidents during the long and dangerous journey. Those who did safely arrive in "the land of opportunities" were often used for the hard labor of building railroads, coal mines, bridges, and canals. The Irish were critical to the quick development of the infrastructure of the United States and Canada. Passenger and immigration lists indicate that members of the Donelan family came to North America quite early:

Donelan Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Michael Donelan, aged 21, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Mauretania" from Southampton, England [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J679-SY6 : 6 December 2014), Michael Donelan, 07 Apr 1919; citing departure port Southampton, arrival port New York, ship name Mauretania, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Mary Donelan, aged 24, originally from Rose Abbey, Ireland, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Cedric" from Liverpool, England [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6WV-SPJ : 6 December 2014), Mary Donelan, 27 Oct 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Cedric, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Sarah Donelan, aged 20, originally from Cloonfad, Ireland, who arrived in New York in 1920 aboard the ship "Celtic" from Liverpool, England [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6D4-44D : 6 December 2014), Sarah Donelan, 07 May 1920; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Celtic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • George Donelan, aged 18, who arrived in New York in 1920 aboard the ship "Aquitania" from Southampton, England [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J68W-5M7 : 6 December 2014), George Donelan, 09 Oct 1920; citing departure port Southampton, arrival port New York, ship name Aquitania, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Ellie Donelan, aged 22, originally from Ireland, who arrived in New York in 1921 aboard the ship "Celtic" from Liverpool, England [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6NF-YPV : 6 December 2014), Ellie Donelan, 25 Apr 1921; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Celtic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Donelan Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Eleanor Donelan, aged 25, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Trafalgar" from Galway, Ireland
  • Mr. Michael Donelan, aged 50 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Virginius" departing 28th May 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 12th August 1847 but he died on board [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 73)
  • Mr. Winford Donelan, aged 40 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Virginius" departing 28th May 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 12th August 1847 but he died on board [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 73)

Contemporary Notables of the name Donelan (post 1700)


  • Christopher J. Donelan (b. 1964), American law enforcement officer and politician
  • Joseph F. Donelan Jr. (1918-1999), United States Assistant Secretary of State for Administration from 1971 to 1973
  • Gerard P. Donelan (b. 1949), American cartoonist who drew "It's a Gay Life"
  • Captain Anthony John Charles Donelan (1846-1924), Irish nationalist politician and soldier
  • Bradleigh Thomas Peter Donelan (b. 1968), English professional cricketer

The Donelan Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Omni violentia major
Motto Translation: Too strong for any violence.


Donelan Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J679-SY6 : 6 December 2014), Michael Donelan, 07 Apr 1919; citing departure port Southampton, arrival port New York, ship name Mauretania, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  2. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6WV-SPJ : 6 December 2014), Mary Donelan, 27 Oct 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Cedric, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  3. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6D4-44D : 6 December 2014), Sarah Donelan, 07 May 1920; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Celtic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J68W-5M7 : 6 December 2014), George Donelan, 09 Oct 1920; citing departure port Southampton, arrival port New York, ship name Aquitania, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  5. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6NF-YPV : 6 December 2014), Ellie Donelan, 25 Apr 1921; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Celtic, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  6. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 73)

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