Cravant History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Cravant is a name of ancient Anglo-Saxon origin and comes from a family once having lived at Craven, a district in North Yorkshire which traces back to the Domesday Book of 1086 where it was listed as Crave. [1] Craven is thought to come from an old Brythonic word, a precursor of the Welsh word "craf" or "garlic." [2]

Early Origins of the Cravant family

The surname Cravant was first found in North Yorkshire (West Riding) at Craven where "the surname has for centuries been very strongly represented. " [3]

One of the first records of the name was found here, specifically John de Crauene who was listed in the Curia Regis Rolls of 1166. [4] The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed the following: Agnes de Craven; Johannes de Crauen; and Roger de Craven. Robert de Craven was rector of Bolton-juxta-Bowland in 1304. [3]

Some of the family were also found at Great Washbourn in Gloucestershire. "It comprises 650 acres, the whole, with the exception of about 100 acres, the property of the Craven family." [5]

And another branch was found at Winwick in Northamptonshire. "The church is in the early English style, with a tower, and contains some handsome monuments of the Craven family. Some remains of an old mansion in the parish have been converted into a farmhouse." [5]

The Irish McRaven variant is actually an Anglicization of the Irish name Mac Crabhain and was found chiefly in Louth-Monaghan. [6]

Early History of the Cravant family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cravant research. Another 158 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1166, 1332, 1664, 1608, 1697, 1610, 1770, 1825, 1585, 1618, 1610, 1618, 1608, 1697, 1623, 1636, 1668, 1711, 1702 and 1711 are included under the topic Early Cravant History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cravant Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore,spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Cravant has been recorded under many different variations, including Craven, Cravene, Cravin, Cravine, Craevin and many more.

Early Notables of the Cravant family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: Sir William Craven (c. 1585-1618), an English merchant, Lord Mayor of London in 1610 (perhaps 1618.) Some people believe that the story of Dick Whittington is based on Craven's career, and he is sometime referred to as "Aptrick's Dick Whittington." William Craven, 1st Earl of Craven (1608-1697), was an...
Another 56 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cravant Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Cravant family to Ireland

Some of the Cravant family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 58 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Cravant family

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Cravant or a variant listed above: Richard Craven who settled in Virginia in the year 1626; Susan Craven who settled in the same Colony in the year 1655; and Thomas, aged 17; who settled in the year 1655. Many of the name also landed at Philadelphia in the year 1805..



The Cravant Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Virtus in actione consistit
Motto Translation: Virtue consists in action.


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  5. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  6. ^ MacLysaght, Edward, More Irish Families. Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 1982. Print. (ISBN 0-7165-0126-0)


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