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Cranny History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The ancestors of the name Cranny come from the ancient Scottish tribe known as the Dalriadans. They lived along the rugged west coast of Scotland and on the Hebrides islands and used the name to indicate a person who lived on the island of Jura in the Inner Hebrides. The name is derived from Gaelic Mac Crain.

Early Origins of the Cranny family


The surname Cranny was first found in the islands of Jura and Islay, where they held a family seat from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

Early History of the Cranny family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cranny research.
Another 221 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 180 , 1625, 1649, 1856 and 128. are included under the topic Early Cranny History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cranny Spelling Variations


Many spelling variations of Cranny have been recorded over the years, including These are the result of the medieval practice of spelling according to sound and repeated translation between Gaelic and English. MacCraney, Craney, Crainey, MacCrain, McCranie, MacCranny, MacCranne, MacCranney, MacCrayne and many more.

Early Notables of the Cranny family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Cranny Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Cranny family to Ireland


Some of the Cranny family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 125 words (9 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Cranny family to the New World and Oceana


Settlers from Scotland put down roots in communities all along the east coast of North America. Some moved north from the American colonies to Canada as United Empire Loyalists during the American War of Independence. As Clan societies and highland games started in North America in the 20th century many Scots rediscovered parts of their heritage. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Cranny were among those contributors:

Cranny Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Lawrence Cranny, who landed in Virginia in 1700 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Cranny Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Michael Cranny, aged 18, who landed in America from Leamington, in 1904
  • Harry Cranny, aged 25, who landed in America from Melbourne, Australia, in 1907
  • Mabel Cranny, aged 25, who emigrated to the United States from Melbourne, Australia, in 1907
  • Martin Cranny, aged 4, who settled in America from Dublin, Ireland, in 1917
  • Michael Cranny, aged 31, who emigrated to the United States from Dublin, Ireland, in 1917
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Cranny Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Mrs. Ann Cranny, aged 30 who emigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Lady Campbell" departing from the port of Dublin, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle in August 1847 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 22)
  • Miss. Mary Cranny who emigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Lady Campbell" departing from the port of Dublin, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle in 1847 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 22)
  • Mr. Patrick Cranny, aged 3 who emigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Lady Campbell" departing from the port of Dublin, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle in August 1847 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 22)
  • Mr. Thomas Cranny, aged 30 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Lady Campbell" departing 3rd June 1847 from Dublin, Ireland; the ship arrived on 5th August 1847 but he died on board [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 71)

Cranny Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Bernard Cranny, aged 24, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1853 aboard the ship "Macedon" [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    South Australian Register Tuesday 11 January 1853. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MACEDON 1853. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/macedon1853.shtml

Contemporary Notables of the name Cranny (post 1700)


  • Robert Francis Cranny, English-born, Australian musician, song writer and music producer

The Cranny Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Amor proximi
Motto Translation: The love of our neighbor.


Cranny Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 22)
  3. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 71)
  4. ^ South Australian Register Tuesday 11 January 1853. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MACEDON 1853. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/macedon1853.shtml

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