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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The ancestry of the name Cramb dates from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It comes from when the family lived in Worcester. The surname is derived from the word Crump, which originated as a nickname for a person who was crooked in the physical sense of stooping with age or illness.

Cramb Early Origins



The surname Cramb was first found in Worcestershire where they held a family seat from early times.

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Cramb Spelling Variations


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Cramb Spelling Variations



Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate spelled their names differently as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Cramb have been found, including Cramp, Cram, Cromp, Crompe, Cramb, Crampe, Crame and many more.

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Cramb Early History


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Cramb Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cramb research. Another 253 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1200, 1275, 1523, and 1610 are included under the topic Early Cramb History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Cramb Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Cramb Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Cramb Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Cramb Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • James Cramb, Scottish convict from Scotland, who was transported aboard the "Adelaide" on August 08, 1849, settling in Van Diemen's Land and Port Phillip, Australia [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 17) Adelaide voyage to Van Diemen's Land and Port Phillip, Australia in 1849 with 303 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/adelaide/1849

Cramb Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Duncan Cramb, aged 28, arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Bombay" in 1865

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Contemporary Notables of the name Cramb (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Cramb (post 1700)



  • John Adam Cramb (1862-1913), Scottish historian and fervent patriot
  • Richard Ian Cramb (b. 1963), Scottish former rugby union player
  • Colin Cramb (b. 1974), Scottish former professional footballer and coach

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fide et amore
Motto Translation: By fidelity and love.


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Cramb Family Crest Products


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Cramb Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 17) Adelaide voyage to Van Diemen's Land and Port Phillip, Australia in 1849 with 303 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/adelaide/1849

Other References

  1. Lennard, Reginald. Rural England 1086-1135 A Study of Social and Agrarian Conditions. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. Print.
  2. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin . Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  3. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
  4. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
  5. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
  6. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  7. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
  8. Hitching, F.K and S. Hitching. References to English Surnames in 1601-1602. Walton On Thames: 1910. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0181-3).
  9. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  10. Crispin, M. Jackson and Leonce Mary. Falaise Roll Recording Prominent Companions of William Duke of Normandy at the Conquest of England. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  11. ...

The Cramb Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Cramb Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 4 April 2016 at 07:45.

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