Home   |   Customer Service   |   Site Map   |   Name Search   |   How To Buy

Shopping Cart
0 Items
FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2015

Where did the English Courier family come from? What is the English Courier family crest and coat of arms? When did the Courier family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Courier family history?

The history of the name Courier dates back to the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It is derived from a member of the family who worked as a messenger or person who dresses tanned leather. In the former case, the surname Courier is derived from the Old French words corŽor or courreour, which mean courier. In the latter case, the surname is derived from the Old French word couraieur, which in turn comes from the Old French word conreeur, which means currier.


Only recently has spelling become standardized in the English language. As the English language evolved in the Middle Ages, the spelling of names changed also. The name Courier has undergone many spelling variations, including Currer, Curror, Currier, Curryer, Conreor, Couraour, Curur, Curreour, Currour, Curryar, Corour and many more.

First found in Yorkshire, where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor of Kildwick from ancient times. .


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Courier research. Another 325 words (23 lines of text) covering the years 1220, 1256, 1293, 1314, 1375, 1379, 1400, 1430, 1546, 1656, 1661, and 1740 are included under the topic Early Courier History in all our PDF Extended History products.


Another 35 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Courier Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.


To escape the unstable social climate in England of this time, many families boarded ships for the New World with the hope of finding land, opportunity, and greater religious and political freedom. Although the voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, those families that arrived often found greater opportunities and freedoms than they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Courier were among those contributors:

Courier Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Mr. Courier, who arrived in Louisiana in 1719

Courier Settlers in Canada in the 17th Century

  • Mathieu Courier, who arrived in Canada in 1653

Courier Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • David Courier, who arrived in Canada in 1828


  • Paul Louis Courier (1772-1825), French writer
  • Jim Courier (b. 1991), tennis player


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Merite
Motto Translation: Merit


Most Popular Family Crest Products
Courier Armorial History With Coat of ArmsCourier Armorial History With Coat of Arms
Courier Coat of Arms & Surname History PackageCourier Coat of Arms & Surname History Package
Courier Family Crest Image (jpg) Heritage SeriesCourier Family Crest Image (jpg) Heritage Series
Courier Coat of Arms/Family Crest Key-chainCourier Coat of Arms/Family Crest Key-chain
Courier Coat of Arms/Family Crest Coffee MugCourier Coat of Arms/Family Crest Coffee Mug
Courier Armorial History with FrameCourier Armorial History with Frame
Courier Framed Surname History and Coat of ArmsCourier Framed Surname History and Coat of Arms



  1. Bradford, William. History of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647 Edited by Samuel Eliot Morrison 2 Volumes. New York: Russell and Russell, 1968. Print.
  2. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
  3. Lennard, Reginald. Rural England 1086-1135 A Study of Social and Agrarian Conditions. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. Print.
  4. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
  5. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
  6. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  7. Bolton, Charles Knowles. Bolton's American Armory. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1964. Print.
  8. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  9. Sanders, Joanne McRee Edition. English Settlers in Barbados 1637-1800. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  10. Fairbairn. Fairbain's book of Crests of the Families of Great Britain and Ireland, 4th Edition 2 volumes in one. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1968. Print.
  11. ...

The Courier Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Courier Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 26 July 2011 at 14:23.

Sign Up

FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more