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Cotinghan History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The present generation of the Cotinghan family is only the most recent to bear a name that dates back to the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. Their name comes from having lived in either of two places called Cottingham. One was a parish near Hull in the East Riding of Yorkshire, and the other is a parish located two miles from Rockingham in the county of Northampton. Thus, the surname Cotinghan belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.


Early Origins of the Cotinghan family


The surname Cotinghan was first found in Yorkshire at Cottingham, a village and civil parish in the East Riding which dates back to the Domesday Book when it was listed as Cotingeham. "This place is of considerable antiquity, and was known as of some importance when Domesday Book was compiled. Leland, in his Collectanea, states that William d'Estoteville or Stuteville, sheriff of Yorkshire, entertained King John here, and obtained from that monarch, in the year 1200, permission to hold a market and fair, and to embattle and fortify his residence." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
The place name literally means "homestead of the family or followers of a man called Cott or Cotta" derived from the Old English personal name + inga + ham. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
Baynard Castle, sometimes named "castle at Cottingham" or "Stuteville's castle" was a moated castle built in the 12th and 13th centuries in the village. Sarum Manor is located in the southern half of the ruins of castle. The Northamptonshire Cottingham was similarly listed with the same spelling in the Domesday Book. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
"A massive ring of pure gold was found in 1841, on the borders of Rockingham Forest, apparently of great antiquity, and in good preservation; it is inscribed in Saxon characters with legends supposed to be of talismanic character, and was probably worn as an amulet." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
One of the first records of the name was Robertus de Cotyngham who was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)

Early History of the Cotinghan family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cotinghan research.
Another 67 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1350, 1300, 1370, 1349, 1356, 1579, 1652 and 1635 are included under the topic Early Cotinghan History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cotinghan Spelling Variations


Until the dictionary, an invention of only the last few hundred years, the English language lacked any comprehensive system of spelling rules. Consequently, spelling variations in names are frequently found in early Anglo-Saxon and later Anglo-Norman documents. One person's name was often spelled several different ways over a lifetime. The recorded variations of Cotinghan include Cottingham, Cotingham, Cattingham, Catingham and others.

Early Notables of the Cotinghan family (pre 1700)


Notables of the family at this time include Thomas de Cottingham (c. 1300-1370), an English cleric and judge ho toook his name from his birth place at Cottingham, East Riding of Yorkshire, Keeper of the Great Seal in 1349 and Master of the...
Another 43 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cotinghan Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Cotinghan family to the New World and Oceana


Thousands of English families boarded ships sailing to the New World in the hope of escaping the unrest found in England at this time. Although the search for opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad took the lives of many because of the cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels, the opportunity perceived in the growing colonies of North America beckoned. Many of the settlers who survived the journey went on to make important contributions to the transplanted cultures of their adopted countries. The Cotinghan were among these contributors, for they have been located in early North American records: Catherine Cottingham, who arrived in Jamaica in 1679; Samuel Cottingham arrived in Philadelphia in 1856; Septimus, Thomas, and Edward, Cottingham, all arrived in Philadelphia in 1870..

Cotinghan Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


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