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Congelton History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Congelton is of Anglo-Saxon origin and came from when the family lived in the town and civil parish of Congleton in the county of Cheshire. The surname Congelton belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.

Early Origins of the Congelton family


The surname Congelton was first found in Cheshire where Congleton dates back to before the Domesday Book where it was listed as Cogeltone, land held by Bigod. At that time,there was land enough for four ploughs, and was worth four shillings. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)

By the 13th century, the place was often spelt Congulton and is probably derived from the Old English words cung + hyll + tun, which literally meant "farmstead at the round-topped hill." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
Baron Congleton, of Congleton in the County Palatine of Chester, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom created for Sir Henry Parnell, 4th Baronet but bears no relationship to the surname's origin other than both share the same ancestral home. Today Congleton has a population of over 25,000.

Alternatively, the name could have originated in "the old barony of Congalton, in the parish of Dirleton, East Lothian, Scotland. The family, however, may have come from Congilton in Cheshire and given that name to their new possession." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

Some of the first records of the family were found here, specifically Robert de Congaltoun, who witnessed a charter of Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, circa 1162. Later, Walter de Congilton witnessed an agreement between the Abbey of Neubotel and John de Morham c. 1214 and also witnessed a charter of Dryburgh Abbey, c. 1224. Wautier de Congeltone and Mabille de Cungiltone, both of the county of Edneburke, rendered homage to King Edward I in 1296. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


Early History of the Congelton family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Congelton research.
Another 404 words (29 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1477, 1430, 1424, 1506 and 1548 are included under the topic Early Congelton History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Congelton Spelling Variations


It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Congelton are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages, even literate people changed the spelling of their names. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. The variations of the name Congelton include: Congleton, Congalton, Congilton and others.

Early Notables of the Congelton family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Congelton Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Congelton family to Ireland


Some of the Congelton family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 82 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Congelton family to the New World and Oceana


Many English families tired of political and religious strife left Britain for the new colonies in North America. Although the trip itself offered no relief - conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and many travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute - these immigrants believed the opportunities that awaited them were worth the risks. Once in the colonies, many of the families did indeed prosper and, in turn, made significant contributions to the culture and economies of the growing colonies. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families has revealed a number of immigrants bearing the name Congelton or a variant listed above: James Congleton who settled in St. Christopher in 1716.

Congelton Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

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