× Home
×

Family Crest and History Search
House of Names
FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The lineage of the name Comtoomb begins with the Anglo-Saxon tribes in Britain. It is a result of when they lived in Compton, a place-name found in numerous locales throughout England. Villages called Compton are found in Berkshire, Huntingdonshire, Surrey, Sussex and Wiltshire. The name probably sprang from all of these locales at one time or another. Many of the villages date back to the Domesday Book [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
where there were listed with names like Contune (Berkshire), Cunone (Huntingdonshire), and more. However, the oldest listing was found in Compton Abbas, Dorset where it dates back before the Domesday Book to 956 as Cumtune. The name literally was derived from the Old English "cumb" + "tun" meaning "farmstead or village in a valley," so one can understand the many listings. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)


Comtoomb Early Origins



The surname Comtoomb was first found in Devon where they held a family seat at Compton Castle, a fortified manor house in the village of Compton. The original undefended manor house was built in the mid-14th century and was home to Sir Humphrey Gilbert (15391583), colonizer of Newfoundland and half-brother of Sir Walter Raleigh. Another branch of the family claims descent from Warwickshire where "the Marquis of Northampton derives from Turchill, possessor of Arden, before the Conquest. His descendant Osbert, in 1169, assumed the name of Compton from his estate in the same county. " [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
Another reference states "the family was seated at Compton, called 'in the Windgate,' soon after the Conquest." [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
"Philip de Compton is the first of the name who certainly held the manor of Compton, in the fifth of John." [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

Close

Comtoomb Spelling Variations


Expand

Comtoomb Spelling Variations



Only recently has spelling become standardized in the English language. As the English language evolved in the Middle Ages, the spelling of names changed also. The name Comtoomb has undergone many spelling variations, including Compton, Comptons, Competom, Comptown, Comptowne, Comptoun, Comptaun, Comptaune, Comptoune, Coompton, Combton, Combtons, Combtown, Combtaune, Wilmington and many more.

Close

Comtoomb Early History


Expand

Comtoomb Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Comtoomb research. Another 431 words (31 lines of text) covering the years 1212, 1650, 1482, 1528, 1630, 1625, 1663, 1632, 1713, 1675, 1713, 1601, 1643, 1622, 1681, 1660, 1681, 1675, 1679, 1669, 1691, 1673, 1743, 1632, 1713, 1675 and 1713 are included under the topic Early Comtoomb History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

Comtoomb Early Notables (pre 1700)


Expand

Comtoomb Early Notables (pre 1700)



Distinguished members of the family include Sir William Compton ( c. 1482-1528), a prominent courtier during the reign of Henry VIII. A fictionalized William Compton was portrayed in 2007 on the television series The Tudors; William Compton, 1st Earl of Northampton (died 1630), known as Lord Compton, an English peer; Sir William...

Another 107 words (8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Comtoomb Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

The Great Migration


Expand

The Great Migration



To escape the unstable social climate in England of this time, many families boarded ships for the New World with the hope of finding land, opportunity, and greater religious and political freedom. Although the voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, those families that arrived often found greater opportunities and freedoms than they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Comtoomb were among those contributors: Thomas Compton settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts, in 1634; and was made a freeman of the colony in 1637. He moved to Boston the same year. John Compton was a wheelwright in Boston in 1638. William Compton settled in Ipswich in 1662.

Close

Motto


Expand

Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Tout bien ou rien
Motto Translation: All well or nothing.


Close

Comtoomb Family Crest Products


Expand

Comtoomb Family Crest Products




Close

See Also


Expand

See Also




Close

Citations


Expand

Citations



  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

Other References

  1. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  2. Burke, Sir Bernard. General Armory Of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Ramsbury: Heraldry Today. Print.
  3. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
  4. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
  5. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  6. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
  7. Humble, Richard. The Fall of Saxon England. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-987-8).
  8. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  9. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  10. Fairbairn. Fairbain's book of Crests of the Families of Great Britain and Ireland, 4th Edition 2 volumes in one. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1968. Print.
  11. ...

The Comtoomb Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Comtoomb Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 30 June 2015 at 10:22.

Sign Up

  


FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
House of Names on Facebook
Follow Houseofnames on Twitter
Houseofnames on Pinterest