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Coak History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Coak is one of the names that was brought to England in the wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. It is a name for a purveyor of cooked meats. The derives from the word cok, which means to cook, and was brought to England shortly after the Norman Conquest of 1066.

Early Origins of the Coak family


The surname Coak was first found in Derbyshire at Barrow, a parish, in the union of Shardlow, partly in the hundred of Appletree. "An estate here, which had been parcel of the manor of Melbourne, was annexed to the see of Carlisle before 1273, and was held on lease, under the bishops, by the family of Coke. This estate was enfranchised by act of parliament in 1704." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
Another ancient branch of the family was found at Billingford in Norfolk. "At Beck Hall, in the parish, the birthplace of Chancellor Bacon, and the ancient seat of the Coke family, an hospital, with a chapel dedicated to St. Thomas a Becket, was founded in the beginning of the reign of Henry III." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Early History of the Coak family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Coak research.
Another 196 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1206, 1340, 1576, 1592, 1613, 1750, 1552, 1634, 1591, 1661, 1624, 1642, 1607, 1650, 1640, 1650, 1563, 1644, 1656, 1653, 1692, 1685, 1674 and 1727 are included under the topic Early Coak History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Coak Spelling Variations


It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Coak are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Coak include Coke, Cokes, Coik, Coike, Coak, Coake, Coeke and others.

Early Notables of the Coak family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Edward Coke (1552-1634), Solicitor General of England, considered to be the greatest jurist of the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras; Henry Coke (1591-1661), an English politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1624 and 1642; Sir John Coke (1607-1650), an English...
Another 103 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Coak Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Coak family to the New World and Oceana


Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Coak, or a variant listed above: Adrian and Henry Coke settled in Barbados in 1635; Elizabeth Coke settled in Providence Island in 1635; Jo, Thomas, and Robert Coke settled in Virginia in 1635.

The Coak Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Prudens qui patiens
Motto Translation: He who is patient is prudent.


Coak Family Crest Products



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Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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