Cherie History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The vast movement of people that followed the Norman Conquest of England of 1066 brought the Cherie family name to the British Isles. They lived in Lincolnshire. They are descended from the line of the House of De Cheries, Seigneurs of Brauvel, Beauval, in Normandy, near Avranches. The name Cherie is derived from the Anglo Norman French word, cherise, which means cherry, [1] and was probably used to indicate a landmark, such as a cherry tree, which distinguished the location bearing the name.

Early Origins of the Cherie family

The surname Cherie was first found in Derbyshire, The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list William Chirie. [2] A few years later in 1284, the Assize Rolls of Lancashire list Rober Chyry. The Subsidy Rolls of Suffolk list Richard Chery in 1524. [1]

Early History of the Cherie family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cherie research. Another 198 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1348, 1368, 1484, 1509, 1524, 1665, 1713, 1683, 1706 and are included under the topic Early Cherie History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cherie Spelling Variations

Anglo-Norman names are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. When the Normans became the ruling people of England in the 11th century, they introduced a new language into a society where the main languages of Old and later Middle English had no definite spelling rules. These languages were more often spoken than written, so they blended freely with one another. Contributing to this mixing of tongues was the fact that medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, ensuring that a person's name would appear differently in nearly every document in which it was recorded. The name has been spelled Cherry, Cherrie, Cherrey, Cherries, Chery, Chearie, Chearry, Cherie and many more.

Early Notables of the Cherie family (pre 1700)

Another 33 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cherie Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Cherie family to Ireland

Some of the Cherie family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 57 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Cherie family

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that plagued their homeland made the frontiers of the New World an attractive prospect. Thousands migrated, aboard cramped disease-ridden ships. They arrived sick, poor, and hungry, but were welcomed in many cases with far greater opportunity than at home in England. Many of these hardy settlers went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Among early immigrants bearing the name Cherie or a variant listed above were: John Cherry landed in America in Virginia in 1637; Franc. Cherry, who arrived in Virginia in 1643; Richard Cherry, who arrived in Virginia in 1655; William Cherry, who came to Virginia in 1659.

Contemporary Notables of the name Cherie (post 1700)

  • Janelle Cherie Falzon OAM (b. 1981), Australian gold and two-time bronze medalist Paralympic swimmer
  • Roseanne Cherie Barr (b. 1952), award-winning American actress, comedienne, writer, television producer and director
  • Cherie M. Solie (b. 1959), American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Alaska, 2004 [3]
  • Cherie Witter (b. 1963), American model and actress
  • Cherie Piper (b. 1981), Canadian five-time gold and three-time silver medalist ice hockey player
  • Cherie Bambury (b. 1976), Australian former cricket player who played for the Australia national women's cricket team
  • Cherie Mary Lunghi (b. 1952), English film, television and theatre actress
  • Cherie Hausler (b. 1973), Australian TV presenter of the Nine Network quiz show The Mint
  • Cherie Gauthier, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1996 [4]

Citations

  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 28) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  4. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 3) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate