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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


The name Cheeld comes from one of the family having worked as a military officer in the 10th century, probably comparable to a modern sergeant. In the Old English, it was rendered cild, which meant child. It was applied to the rank above the common soldier in that period, probably because they were in charge of "children." Later, in the 13th and 14th centuries, it came to denote a young man in training for the knighthood.

Cheeld Early Origins



The surname Cheeld was first found in Hertfordshire. However, some of the family were found at Wanstead in Essex in later years. "The village is situated on the borders of Waltham Forest, near the main road from London to Cambridge; and is principally worthy of note as the site of Wanstead House, built in 1715, by Sir Richard (son of Sir Josiah) Child, created Viscount Castlemain in 1718, and Earl of Tylney in 1731. This splendid mansion was considerably enlarged and embellished by his descendants, and was surrounded by a very extensive park, laid out with great taste, and interspersed with gardens, pleasure-grounds, and grottos." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Cheeld Spelling Variations


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Cheeld Spelling Variations



Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate spelled their names differently as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Cheeld have been found, including: Child, Childe, Childs, Childes and others.

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Cheeld Early History


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Cheeld Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cheeld research. Another 295 words (21 lines of text) covering the years 1086, 1280, 1379, 1784, 1606, 1697, 1660, 1697, 1690, 1630, 1699, 1673, 1677, 1703, 1702, 1703, 1642, 1713, 1698, 1702, 1705, 1708, 1674, 1721, 1713, 1715 and 1715 are included under the topic Early Cheeld History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Cheeld Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Cheeld Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notables of the family at this time include William Child (1606-1697), an English composer and organist, First Organist of the Chapel Royal (1660-1697); Sir John Child, 1st Baronet (died 1690), Governor of Bombay, first governor-general of the British settlements in India; Sir Josiah Child of Wanstead, 1st Baronet (1630-1699), English merchant...

Another 82 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cheeld Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Families began migrating abroad in enormous numbers because of the political and religious discontent in England. Often faced with persecution and starvation in England, the possibilities of the New World attracted many English people. Although the ocean trips took many lives, those who did get to North America were instrumental in building the necessary groundwork for what would become for new powerful nations. Among the first immigrants of the name Cheeld, or a variant listed above to cross the Atlantic and come to North America were : Joseph Childs who settled in Watertown, Massachusetts, and became a freeman in 1654. Benjamin Childs of Roxbury, Massachusetts, lived at what is now Brookline, Massachusetts. Benjamin's son Ephraim was killed by the Indians at Northfield on September 4th in the year 1675.

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Cheeld Family Crest Products


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Cheeld Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Bullock, L.G. Historical Map of England and Wales. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1971. Print.
  2. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  3. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  4. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  5. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
  6. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
  7. Holt, J.C. Ed. Domesday Studies. Woodbridge: Boydell, 1987. Print. (ISBN 0-85115-477-8).
  8. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  9. Hitching, F.K and S. Hitching. References to English Surnames in 1601-1602. Walton On Thames: 1910. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0181-3).
  10. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
  11. ...

The Cheeld Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Cheeld Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 29 February 2016 at 12:47.

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