Cations History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The present generation of the Cations family is only the most recent to bear a name that dates back to the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. Their name comes from having lived in Norfolk. However, there are numerous other places named Catton including: a chapelry in the parish of Croxall, Derbyshire; a parish in East Riding Yorkshire; a township in the parish of Topcliffe, North Riding of Yorkshire; and Caton, a chapelry in the parish of Lancaster. [1]

One source notes that the family may have been anciently Norman in origin: "Herebert Katune, of Normandy, 1198 (Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae). This may mean the English family of De Catton, which it shows to have been Norman." [2]

Early Origins of the Cations family

The surname Cations was first found in Norfolk "from time immemorial till the middle of the last century. Until the close of the XVI. cent., Catton and De Catton; from the manor of Catton near Norwich, which in Domesday is spelt Catun and Catuna. The Latinizations Catonus, Gathonus, and Chattodunus occur in old records." [3]

"The Catons of Essex are probably a branch of the ancient family of Caton or Catton of Norfolk." [4]

Researchers scanning through early rolls discovered the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 listed Robert de Catton, or Cattune: Norfolk, 1273; and John Caton, Huntingdonshire. The Lay Subsidy Rolls listed John de Caton, of Lancaster, Lancashire. And the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Johannes de Catton; and Willelmus de Caytton. [1]

Walter Catton or Chattodunus (d. 1343), was "a Franciscan friar of Norwich, was, according to some authorities, head of the Minorite convent situated between the churches of St. Cuthbert and St. Vedast. He seems to have been an author of some repute in his generation, and was, according to Bale, a great student of Aristotle. Towards the close of his life he was summoned to Avignon by the Pope, and died a penitentiary in that city in 1343. " [5]

Early History of the Cations family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cations research. Another 95 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1636, 1665 and 1652 are included under the topic Early Cations History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cations Spelling Variations

Until the dictionary, an invention of only the last few hundred years, the English language lacked any comprehensive system of spelling rules. Consequently, spelling variations in names are frequently found in early Anglo-Saxon and later Anglo-Norman documents. One person's name was often spelled several different ways over a lifetime. The recorded variations of Cations include Caton, Catton, Cattan, Catten, Caten and others.

Early Notables of the Cations family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include William Caton (1636-1665), an early English Quaker itinerant preacher and writer. He "was probably a near relation of Margaret Askew, afterwards wife of Thomas Fell, vice-chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster. At the age of fourteen he was taken by his father to the judge's house at Swarthmore...
Another 53 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cations Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Cations migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Cations Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Alexander Cations, a tanner, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832


The Cations Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cautes metuit fovean lupus
Motto Translation: The cautious wolf fears the snare.


  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  3. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  5. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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