Carrothers History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms 

The Strathclyde-Briton people of ancient Scotland were the first to use the name Carrothers. The Carrothers family lived in the land of Carruthers in the parish of Middlebie, Dumfriesshire. Interestingly in that area, then name is pronounced "Cridders." [1]

Early Origins of the Carrothers family

The surname Carrothers was first found in Dumfriesshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Dhùn Phris), a Southern area, bordering on England that today forms part of the Dumfries and Galloway Council Area, where by the 12th century the family had become hereditary Stewards of the Annandale district of the border allied to the Bruces and the Stewarts. One of the first records of the name was Simon Carruthers who swore an oath of allegiance to Edward I in 1296. A few years later, John de Carutherys received a charter of the lands of Musfald and Appliltrewayt in 1320. [1]

Important Dates for the Carrothers family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Carrothers research. Another 87 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1344, 1429, and 1702 are included under the topic Early Carrothers History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Carrothers Spelling Variations

The variation in the spelling of Medieval names is a result of the lack of spelling rules in the English language prior to the last few hundred years. Before that time, scribes spelled according to sound, often varying the spelling of name within a single document. Carrothers has appeared as Carruthers, Carothers, Carouthers, Carrothers, Carruther, Carruthirs, Carruthers, Carrutherys, Cridders, Gridders and many more.

Early Notables of the Carrothers family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Carrothers Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Carrothers family to Ireland

Some of the Carrothers family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 82 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Carrothers migration to the United States

As the persecution of Clan families continued, they sailed for North America in increasing numbers. In most cases, they found the freedom and opportunity they sought. Land was often available and the American War of Independence allowed Scots an opportunity to solidify their independence from the English crown. These settlers and their ancestors went on to play essential roles in the forging of the nations of the United States and Canada. Among them:

Carrothers Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Robert Carrothers, who landed in America in 1804 [2]

Carrothers migration to Canada

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Carrothers Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James Carrothers, aged 2 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Triton" departing 14th May 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 24th July 1847 but he died on board [3]
  • Miss. Mary Carrothers, aged 3 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Triton" departing 14th May 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 24th July 1847 but she died on board [3]

Contemporary Notables of the name Carrothers (post 1700)

  • Frank Carrothers, American Republican politician, Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1940 [4]

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Citations

  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  3. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 68)
  4. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 12) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
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