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Carolyn History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The Irish name Carolyn claims descent from the O'Connors in Donegal where "Carlan" (from the Irish "carla" meaning a "wool-comb" and "an" meaning "one who" which roughly translates as "one who combs wool") was in Irish O'Carlain or O'Caireallain.


Early Origins of the Carolyn family


The surname Carolyn was first found in County Limerick (Irish: Luimneach) located in Southwestern Ireland, in the province of Munster, where the name is descended from the O'Connor stem, Kings of Connaught and the family became early associated with the county of Tyrone, and in neighboring counties.

Early History of the Carolyn family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Carolyn research.
Another 130 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1172, 1738, 1799, 1535, 1568, 1670 and 1738 are included under the topic Early Carolyn History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Carolyn Spelling Variations


Many spelling variations of the surname Carolyn can be found in the archives. One reason for these variations is that ancient scribes and church officials recorded names as they were pronounced, often resulting in a single person being recorded under several different spellings. The different spellings that were found include Carlin, Carling, O'Carolan, Carline, Karlin, Kerling, Kerline, Carlind, Carlynde, Carlyne, Carlyn, Carrlin, Carrling, Kerlynd, Kerlynde, Karlynd, Karline, Kearlin, Kearline, Kearlynd, Carolan, Carrolan, Carolyn, Carolyne, Caroline, Carolynde, Caraline, Carroline, Carlan, Carland, Carlon, Carlone, Karolin, Karolan, Karrolin and many more.

Early Notables of the Carolyn family (pre 1700)


Notable amongst the family name at this time was Hugh O'Carolan, Bishop of Clogher from 1535-1568. Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) was a blind early Irish harper, composer and singer, known for his gift for melodic composition. Born in Nobber, County Meath, his father took a job with the MacDermott Roe family of...
Another 111 words (8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Carolyn Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Carolyn family to the New World and Oceana


In the 19th century, thousands of Irish left their English-occupied homeland for North America. Like most new world settlers, the Irish initially settled on the eastern shores of the continent but began to move westward with the promise of owning land. The height of this Irish migration came during the Great Potato Famine of the late 1840s. With apparently nothing to lose, Irish people left on ships bound for North America and Australia. Unfortunately a great many of these passengers lost their lives - the only thing many had left - to disease, starvation, and accidents during the long and dangerous journey. Those who did safely arrive in "the land of opportunities" were often used for the hard labor of building railroads, coal mines, bridges, and canals. The Irish were critical to the quick development of the infrastructure of the United States and Canada. Passenger and immigration lists indicate that members of the Carolyn family came to North America quite early: John Carlin, his wife and their two children who arrived in South Carolina in 1752; Jean Carlin, who came to Halifax, N.S. in 1752; Phillip Carling, who was on record in New York State in 1811.

Contemporary Notables of the name Carolyn (post 1700)


  • Adele Carolyn Morales (1925-2015), American painter and memoirist, second wife of American author-playwright Norman Mailer
  • Julia Carolyn McWilliams (1912-2004), birth name of Julia Child, American chef, author, and television personality, recipient of the three Emmys, five more Emmy nominations and a Peabody Award
  • Ann Carolyn Telnaes (b. 1960), American (Swedish born) editorial cartoonist awarded the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning
  • Marcia Carolyn Kaptur (b. 1946), American Democrat politician, U.S. Representative from Ohio 9th District, 1983-; Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 6) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Carolyn Cohen (1929-2017), American Professor Emeritus of Biology at Brandeis University
  • Carolyn Fetterolf, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1964 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 2) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Carolyn Eisele (1902-2000), American mathematician and historian of mathematics from The Bronx, New York City
  • Carolyn "Cali" Timmins (b. 1963), Canadian former actress, known for her role as Maggie Shelby in the soap Ryan's Hope (1983-1989), granddaughter of Noah Timmins
  • Carolyn McLauglin, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 2008
  • Carolyn S. Tomei, American Democrat politician,Mayor of Milwaukie, Oregon, 1998-2001; Member of Oregon State House of Representatives 25th District, 2001 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, October 21) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

The Carolyn Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Felis demulcta mitis
Motto Translation: A stroked cat is gentle.


Carolyn Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 6) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 2) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, October 21) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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