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Carnathan History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The original Gaelic form of the name Carnathan is O Cearnachain, which is derived from the word "cearnach," which means "victorious."

Early Origins of the Carnathan family


The surname Carnathan was first found in County Donegal (Irish: Dún na nGall), northwest Ireland in the province of Ulster, sometimes referred to as County Tyrconnel, where they held a family seat from ancient times.

Early History of the Carnathan family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Carnathan research.
Another 179 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 117 and 1172 are included under the topic Early Carnathan History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Carnathan Spelling Variations


In the Middle Ages many people were recorded under different spellings each time their name was written down. Research on the Carnathan family name revealed numerous spelling variations, including Kernahan, Kernaghan, Carnahan, Carnaghan and others.

Early Notables of the Carnathan family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Carnathan Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Carnathan family to the New World and Oceana


Ireland saw an enormous decrease in its population in the 19th century due to immigration and death. This pattern of immigration began slowly in the late 18th century and gradually grew throughout the early portion of the 19th century. However, a dramatic increase in the country's immigration numbers occurred when the Great Potato Famine struck in the 1840s. The early immigrants to North America were primarily destined to be farmers tending to their own plot of land, those that came later initially settled within pre-established urban centers. These urban immigrants provided the cheap labor that the fast developing United States and soon to be Canada required. Regardless of their new lifestyle in North America, the Irish immigrants to the United States and Canada made invaluable contributions to their newly adopted societies. An investigation of immigrant and passenger lists revealed many Carnathans:

Carnathan Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Mrs Jane Carnathan, aged 34, originally from Johnston, who arrived in New York in 1897 aboard the ship "Furnessia" from Glasgow, Scotland [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JXW1-Z2K : 6 December 2014), Mrs Jane Carnathan, 20 Sep 1897; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Furnessia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • John Carnathan, aged 10, originally from Johnston, who arrived in New York in 1897 aboard the ship "Furnessia" from Glasgow, Scotland [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JXW1-Z2G : 6 December 2014), John Carnathan, 20 Sep 1897; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Furnessia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Jessie Carnathan, originally from Johnston, who arrived in New York in 1897 aboard the ship "Furnessia" from Glasgow, Scotland [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JXW1-Z2R : 6 December 2014), Jessie Carnathan, 20 Sep 1897; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Furnessia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Carnathan Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • James Carnathan, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Columbia" from Glasgow, Scotland [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6W1-LMS : 6 December 2014), James Carnathan, 30 Aug 1919; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Columbia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Contemporary Notables of the name Carnathan (post 1700)


  • Bryan Carnathan, American Canon camera reviewer for The-Digital-Picture.com
  • Paul Carnathan, American linesman at the 2014 and 2015 IIHF World Championship

Carnathan Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JXW1-Z2K : 6 December 2014), Mrs Jane Carnathan, 20 Sep 1897; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Furnessia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  2. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JXW1-Z2G : 6 December 2014), John Carnathan, 20 Sep 1897; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Furnessia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  3. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JXW1-Z2R : 6 December 2014), Jessie Carnathan, 20 Sep 1897; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Furnessia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6W1-LMS : 6 December 2014), James Carnathan, 30 Aug 1919; citing departure port Glasgow, arrival port New York, ship name Columbia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

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