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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


In ancient Scotland, the first people to use Carmakhell as a surname were the Strathclyde- Britons. It was a name someone who lived in the barony of Carmichael in the county of Lanarkshire where the earliest existing records of the family indicate that they resided in this county before the 11th century Norman Conquest. Records show that they lived at Glegern (now Cleghorn,) which they were granted in the late 12th century by King David I of Scotland. Robert de Caramicely is mentioned in records in 1226. William de Creimechel witnessed a charter by Nerssus de Lundors c. 1225. Little is mentioned of the family until more than a century later when William de Carmichael is mentioned in a charter of lands of Poufeigh c. 1350 and Sir John de Carmychell had a charter of the lands of Carmychell between 1374 and 1384 granted by William earl of Douglas for his assistance of King Charles VI of France against the English. Today, Carmichael is a small village between Lanark and Biggar, in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, home to the "Discover Carmichael Centre," featuring the history of the Carmichael family in Scotland.

Carmakhell Early Origins



The surname Carmakhell was first found in Lanarkshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Lannraig) a former county in the central Strathclyde region of Scotland, now divided into the Council Areas of North Lanarkshire, South Lanarkshire, and the City of Glasgow. George Carmichael "thesaurer" of Glasgow was elected bishop late in 1482 but died the following year without having been confirmed. A few years later, John of Carmichael was an Edinburgh councillor in 1518. John Kirkmichael of Carmichael who escaped the carnage of Verneuil in 1424 was appointed by the French king for the recognition of the great services by the Scots in France. He was known in French history as Jean de St. Michael and founded there a cathedral which was maintained for his fellow Scottish countrymen slain at Verneuil.

In the Battle of Beauge, Sir John distinguished himself by unseating the Duke of Clarence, the English King's brother, but broke his lance; hence the Family Crest became the broken lance.


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Carmakhell Spelling Variations


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Carmakhell Spelling Variations



The origin of rules governing the spelling of names and even words is a very recent innovation. Before that, words and names were spelled according to sound, and, therefore, often appeared under several different spelling variations in a single document. Carmakhell has been spelled Carmichael, Carmichail, Carmichale, Carmicham, Carmackhell and many more.

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Carmakhell Early History


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Carmakhell Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Carmakhell research. Another 35 words (2 lines of text) covering the years 1672, 1729 and are included under the topic Early Carmakhell History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Carmakhell Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Carmakhell Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 19 words (1 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Carmakhell Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Carmakhell In Ireland


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Carmakhell In Ireland



Some of the Carmakhell family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 107 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



The persecution faced in their homeland left many Scots with little to do but sail for the colonies of North Ameri ca. There they found land, freedom, opportunity, and nations in the making. They fought for their freedom in the American War of Independence, or traveled north to Canada as United Empire Loyalists. In both cases, they made enormous contributions to the formation of those great nations. Among them: Andrew Carmichael who settled in Maryland in 1774 with his brother Archibald, and his wife Mary; Donald settled in New York State in 1738; Dugald Carmichael and his wife Catherine and four children settled in New York state in 1739.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Toujours prest
Motto Translation: Always ready.


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Carmakhell Family Crest Products


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Carmakhell Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Barrow, G.W.S Ed. The Charters of David I The Written Acts of David I King of Scots, 1124-53 and of His Son Henry, Earl of Northumerland, 1139-52. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 1999. Print.
    2. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
    3. Catholic Directory For Scotland. Glasgow: Burns Publications. Print.
    4. Bradford, William. History of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647 Edited by Samuel Eliot Morrison 2 Volumes. New York: Russell and Russell, 1968. Print.
    5. Skordas, Guest. Ed. The Early Settlers of Maryland an Index to Names or Immigrants Complied from Records of Land Patents 1633-1680 in the Hall of Records Annapolis, Maryland. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1968. Print.
    6. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
    7. Magnusson, Magnus. Chambers Biographical Dictionary 5th edition. Edinburgh: W & R Chambers, 1990. Print.
    8. Barrow, G.W.S Ed. Acts of Malcom IV 1153-65 Volume I Regesta Regum Scottorum 1153-1424. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1960. Print.
    9. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
    10. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
    11. ...

    The Carmakhell Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Carmakhell Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 17 September 2013 at 12:11.

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