Blewet History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Blewet family's name is derived from the ancient Norman culture that was established in Britain following the Norman Conquest of island in 1066. Their name originated with an early member who was a person with blue eyes, or who often wore blue clothing. The name stems from the Old French root bleuet which means blue. The family claimed Briqueville-la-Blouette, in Normandy as their point of origin. This name was still represented there as "Blouet de Cahagnolles," belonging to the Bailiwick of Caen, sat in the great Assembly of the Norman nobles in 1789. [1]

Early Origins of the Blewet family

The surname Blewet was first found in Hampshire where Richard Blouet is on the Dives Roll; and Ralph Bloiet was an undertenant in the Domesday Book of 1086. He is mentioned in the Monasticon Anglicanum as a benefactor to Gloucester Abbey. [1]

Robert Bloet (Bloett) (died 1123), was an early English prelate. He was Bishop of Lincoln 1093-1123 and Lord Chancellor of England (1092-1093.) He claimed descent from a Norman noble family that held Ivry in Normandy. He accompanied William the Conqueror's son, William Rufus to England from Normandy.

He was brother of Hugh, Bishop of Bayeux. "When the king lay on his death-bed at Rouen, he sent Bloet to England with a letter praying Archbishop Lanfranc to crown William Rufus. Bloet crossed the Channel in company with Rufus himself, and became the new king's chancellor. After the death of Remigius in 1092, the see of Lincoln was kept vacant for a year. Rufus, however, repented of his evil ways while he lay sick at Gloucester in the spring of 1093, and at the same time that he made Anselm archbishop he gave the bishopric of Lincoln to Robert Bloet." [2]

The son or grandson of this fabled Earl, Sir Roland Bluet, became Lord of Raglan in right of his wife Lucretia, and his posterity held the castle for several generations. William Bluett was summoned with other barons to march against the Welsh in 1256. [1]

From these very early entry of the family, the family dispersed as seen by the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 listing: John Bleuit, Gloucestershire; Robert Bluet, Lincolnshire; and Walter Bluet, London. [3]

"The family of Bluet is said by Camden to have come from Brittany. The name is spelt in the Battel Roll Bluet, and Bluat, and elsewhere Bloet." [4]

Early History of the Blewet family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Blewet research. Another 341 words (24 lines of text) covering the years 1566, 1566, 1656, 1644 and 1172 are included under the topic Early Blewet History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Blewet Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, Norman French and other languages became incorporated into English throughout the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Blewet include Blewett, Blewitt, Bluet, Bluat, Bloet, Blouet, Blewit, Blewet and many more.

Early Notables of the Blewet family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Ralph Bloet who was seized of the manor of Daglingworth, temp. Henry II. in Leicestershire. His son named Morgan, was elected Bishop of Durham, but was denied a dispensation by the Pope, as the canons require in case of bastardy, because he persisted to own himself the King's son, and not...
Another 59 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Blewet Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Blewet family to Ireland

Some of the Blewet family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 42 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Blewet migration to the United States +

In England at this time, the uncertainty of the political and religious environment of the time caused many families to board ships for distant British colonies in the hopes of finding land and opportunity, and escaping persecution. The voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, though, and many arrived in North America sick, starved, and destitute. Those who did make it, however, were greeted with greater opportunities and freedoms that they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Early immigration records have shown some of the first Blewets to arrive on North American shores:

Blewet Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • John and Margery Blewet, who settled in Virginia in 1622
  • John Blewet, who landed in Virginia in 1622 [5]
  • Margery Blewet, who arrived in Virginia in 1622 [5]


The Blewet Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: In Deo omnia
Motto Translation: In God are all things.


  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  5. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)


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