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Blancot History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The family name Blancot dates back to Medieval France and a region known as Normandy. It was a name given to a person who was "blanc" or in English "white." It was no doubt originally given to a man with white or blond hair and the feminine form, Blanche, was usually given to a woman that possessed great beauty [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Dionne, N.-E., Origine Des Familles Canadiennes-Français. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1969. Print.
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Early Origins of the Blancot family


The surname Blancot was first found in Normandy (French: Normandie), the former Duchy of Normandy, where this ancient family were part of the Royal House of Blois and held a family seat with lands, titles, estates and manors. Members of this family were the hereditary Barons of Bailleul of Norman Conquest fame, and who assisted Duke William of Normandy, head of the House of Blois, in his conquest of England in 1066. Members of this distinguished and Royal family branched to many locations throughout Europe and amongst the locations were: Silesia, Holland, Italy and Britain. The earliest record of the name Blanch occurred in Normandy between 1180-95 with William Blanc and Robert and John Blanche. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)

Another early finding of the name was Blanche of Navarre (1226-1283), also known as Blanche of Champagne, was the daughter of Theobald the Troubador, King of Navarre and Count of Champagne, and his second wife Agnes of Beaujeu. Blanche of Navarre (French: Blanche d'Évreux) (1330-1398) was Queen consort of France as the wife of King Philip VI of France. Blanche I (1387-1441) was Queen of Navarre from 1425 to 1441 and her daughter Blanche II of Navarre (1424-1464), was titular Queen of Navarre (1461-1464) and by marriage Princess of Asturias.

Another source also claims that the name could come from the Vendée, a department in western France and the town of Noirmoutiers, an island off of the west coast of France [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Dionne, N.-E., Origine Des Familles Canadiennes-Français. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1969. Print.
. The name Blanche was first recorded in the western part of France with two former noble families. In Britain, Colin Blanche was a member of the house of the Duchess in 1400, Jean, was an armed archer for the Duc in 1420, and François, was a man involved in an armed watch of the city of Dinan in 1489 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Hozier, Charles D, and Antoine Bachelin-Delforenne. État présent De La Noblesse française (1883-1887): Contenant Le Distionnaire De La Noblesse Contemporaine Et Larmorial général De France, Dapres Les Manuscrits De Ch. D Hozier. Librairie Des Bibliophiles, 1884. Print.
. The noble family with the name Blanche in Normandy and in Maine was maintained in the 1666 election around the time that Philippe was the Archbishop of Tours. The names including the article, such as Le Blanc, were most commonly seen in Northern France. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Dauzat, Albert, Morlet, Marie-Thérèse, Dictionaire Étymologique des Noms et Prénoms de France. Paris: Librairie Larousse, 1987. Print.


Early History of the Blancot family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Blancot research.
Another 173 words (12 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Blancot History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Blancot Spelling Variations


Changes of spelling have occurred in most surnames. The earliest explanation is that during the early development of the French language, names were not yet fixed in spelling. Usually a person gave his version of his name, phonetically, to a scribe, a priest, or a recorder. This depended on accent, and local accents frequently changed the spelling of a name. Some variables were adopted by different branches of the family name. Hence, there are some spelling variations of the name Blancot, including Leblanc, Lebland, Leblang, Le Blanc, Blanc, Blanche, Blanchet, Blancheteau, Blancheton, Blanchonnet, Blanchot, Blanchaud, Blanquet, Blancot, Bianchi, Blanchecappe, Blanchecotte, Le Blank, Blank, Blanque, Blanke, Blancke and many more.

Early Notables of the Blancot family (pre 1700)


Another 41 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Blancot Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Blancot family to the New World and Oceana


France finally gave land incentives for 2,000 migrants during the 1700s. Early marriage was encouraged in New France, and youths of 18 took fourteen-year-old girls for their wives. The fur trade was developed and attracted migrants, both noble and commoner from France. 15,000 explorers left Montreal in the late 17th and 18th centuries, leaving French names scattered across the continent. The search for the Northwest passage continued. Migration from France to New France or Quebec, as it was now more popularly called, continued until 1759. By 1675, there were 7000 French in Quebec. By the same year the Acadian presence in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had reached 500. In the treaty of Utrecht, the Acadians were ceded by France to Britain in 1713. In 1755, 10,000 French Acadians refused to take an oath of allegiance to England and were deported. They found refuge in Louisiana. Meanwhile, in Quebec, the French race flourished, founding in Lower Canada, one of the two great solitudes which became Canada. Many of this distinguished family name Blancot were prominent in social, cultural, religious and political affairs in France and New France. Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name Blancot were Anne, Catherine, Elizabeth, Desiré LeBlanc with his wife Marie, Jacques LeBlanc and with his wife Joseth, Simon LeBlanc with his wife Marie Joseph, and Jerome LeBlanc, who all settled in Oxford county in Quebec in 1763.

The Blancot Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sans tache
Motto Translation: Without stain.


Blancot Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Dionne, N.-E., Origine Des Familles Canadiennes-Français. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1969. Print.
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  3. ^ Hozier, Charles D, and Antoine Bachelin-Delforenne. État présent De La Noblesse française (1883-1887): Contenant Le Distionnaire De La Noblesse Contemporaine Et Larmorial général De France, Dapres Les Manuscrits De Ch. D Hozier. Librairie Des Bibliophiles, 1884. Print.
  4. ^ Dauzat, Albert, Morlet, Marie-Thérèse, Dictionaire Étymologique des Noms et Prénoms de France. Paris: Librairie Larousse, 1987. Print.

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