Barth History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Barth family

The surname Barth was first found in Berwickshire, in Scotland, where they held a family seat from ancient times.

Bartholomew (d. 1184), was Bishop of Exeter and a native of Brittany. "He was for some time archdeacon of Exeter. His appointment to the bishopric was due to the influence of Archbishop Theobald, who shortly before his death wrote a most urgent letter recommending him to the notice of Henry II and his chancellor, Becket (1161). " [1]

Saint Bartholomew (d. 1193), was a Northumbrian hermit of some celebrity, who flourished in the twelfth century. "His life was most probably written by Galfrid, the author of the biography of St. Godric, and a monk of Bartholomew's own monastery of St. Mary at Durham. In any case, it professes to be written in the lifetime of the saint's contemporaries. According to this life, Bartholomew was born at Witeb or Whitby. His real name, we are told, was Tostius (Tostig?), which his parents changed to William to avoid the laughter of his playmates. " [1]

Early History of the Barth family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Barth research. Another 67 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Barth History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Barth Spelling Variations

During the era when a person's name, tribe and posterity was one of his most important possessions, many different spellings were found in the archives examined. Barth occurred in many references, and spelling variations of the name found included Bartholomew, Bartholemewe, Bartholemew and many more.

Early Notables of the Barth family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Barth Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Barth migration to the United States +

Gradually becoming disenchanted with life in Ireland many of these uprooted families sailed aboard the armada of sailing ships known as the "White Sails" which plied the stormy Atlantic. These overcrowded ships often arrived with only 60 to 70% of their original passenger list, many dying of illness and the elements, were buried at sea. In North America, early immigrants bearing the family name Barth, or a spelling variation of the surname include:

Barth Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Zacharias Barth, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1730 [2]
  • John Jacob Barth, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1736 [2]
  • Johan Jacob Barth, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1736 [2]
  • Jacob Barth, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1738 [2]
  • Frantz Ludwig Barth, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1738 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Barth Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Karl Gottlieb Barth, who landed in Maryland in 1836 [2]
  • Mrs. Michael Barth, who arrived in North America in 1837 [2]
  • Jost Barth, who landed in North America in 1837 [2]
  • Karl Barth, who arrived in Brazil in 1840 [2]
  • Nicholas Barth, aged 29, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Maryland in 1840 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Barth Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Alfred Oswald Barth, who arrived in Arkansas in 1901 [2]

Canada Barth migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Barth Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Adam Barth, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1783

Contemporary Notables of the name Barth (post 1700) +

  • Connor Thomas Barth (b. 1986), American NFL football placekicker
  • Brigadier-General Charles Henry Jr. Barth (1903-1943), American Chief of Staff, US European Theater of Operations (1943) [3]
  • John Simmons Barth (b. 1930), American novelist and professor of English
  • Isaac Barth, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arizona Territory, 1904 [4]
  • Gustav A. Barth, American politician, Member of New York State Assembly from Richmond County, 1896 [4]
  • Gisele Barth, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Dakota, 2000 [4]
  • Frederic H. Barth, American Republican politician, Postmaster at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1959-61 (acting, 1959-61) [4]
  • Frank Barth, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1952 [4]
  • Evelyn P. Barth, American politician, Anderson Coalition Candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1980 [4]
  • Charles F. Barth, American Democrat politician, Chair of Seward County Democratic Party, 1940; Secretary of Nebraska Democratic Party, 1940; Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nebraska, 1944, 1948 [4]
  • ... (Another 15 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Bismarck
  • Johannees Barth (1918-1941), German Matrosenobergefreiter who served aboard the German Battleship Bismarck during World War II when it was sunk heading to France; he died in the sinking [5]
  • Heinrich Barth (1916-1941), German Funkmaat who served aboard the German Battleship Bismarck during World War II when it was sunk heading to France; he died in the sinking [5]
USS Arizona
  • Mr. DeWayne Barth, American Boatswain's Mate First Class working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he survived the sinking [6]


The Barth Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ad alta
Motto Translation: To high things.


  1. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  3. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2011, October 6) Charles Barth. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Barth/Charles_Henry_Jr./USA.html
  4. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 28) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  5. ^ Bismarck & Tirpitz Class - Crew List Bismarck. (Retrieved 2018, February 06). Retrieved from https://www.bismarck-class.dk/bismarck/crew/bismarck_crew.html#crew_details
  6. ^ Pearl Harbour: USS Arizona Casualties List Pearl Harbour December 7, 1941. (Retrieved 2018, July 31st). Retrieved from http://pearl-harbor.com/arizona/casualtylist.html


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