Barrin History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

"The word Baron is of Celtic extraction, and originally synonymous with man in general. It has this meaning in the Salic law, and in. the laws of the Lombards; in the English law, the phrase Baron and feme is equivalent to man and wife. It was afterward used to denote a man of respectability, a stout or valiant man. From denoting a stout or valiant man, it was employed as a name for a distinguished military leader, who having fought and conquered under some great commander, was afterward rewarded by him with a part of the lands which he had acquired." [1]

Early Origins of the Barrin family

The surname Barrin was first found in Baron, near Caen, Normandy. "William de Baron, son of Aiulph de Foro, was an early benefactor to Ardennes Abbey Normandy." [2]

The family landed in Devon shortly after the Conquest where Richard le Baron held one and a half fee there in 1165. [2]

While this early record follows the first Norman landing in Britain, we found another earlier record in 1095 when Lefuine Baron held estates at Bury in Suffolk. [3]

Later records at Sotterley in Suffolk listed the following: "The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of Frederick Barne, Esq., whose ancestor, Sir George Barne, was lord mayor of London in the time of Edward VI." [4]

Geoffrey le Barun was listed in the Assize Rolls of Hampshire in 1236 and a few years later John Barn was listed in the Subsidy Rolls of Sussex in 1296. [3]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 listed Richard le Baron in Devon; and Geoffrey le Barun in Oxfordshire. [5]

Important Dates for the Barrin family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Barrin research. Another 419 words (30 lines of text) covering the years 1685, 1400, 1500, 1508, 1428, 1477, 1488, 1539, 1534, 1555, 1647, 1505, 1520, 1722, 1705, 1726, 1715, 1718 and are included under the topic Early Barrin History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Barrin Spelling Variations

Barrin has been spelled many different ways. Before English spelling became standardized over the last few hundred years, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. As the English language changed in the Middle Ages, absorbing pieces of Latin and French, as well as other languages, the spelling of people's names also changed considerably, even over a single lifetime. Spelling variants included: Baron, Barrone, Barron, Barne, Barone and others.

Early Notables of the Barrin family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include William Barons or Barnes (d. 1505), Bishop of London and Master of the Rolls, "about whom singularly little is known, appears to have been educated at Oxford, where he took the degree of LL.D., but in what college or hall he studied has not been ascertained. " [6] Stephen Baron (d...
Another 56 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Barrin Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Barrin family to Ireland

Some of the Barrin family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 89 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Barrin migration to Canada

In an attempt to escape the chaos experienced in England, many English families boarded overcrowded and diseased ships sailing for the shores of North America and other British colonies. Those families hardy enough, and lucky enough, to make the passage intact were rewarded with land and a social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families became important contributors to the young colonies in which they settled. Early immigration and passenger lists have documented some of the first Barrins to arrive on North American shores:

Barrin Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Hugh Barrin, aged 20, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Nancy" in 1834

Citations

  1. ^ Arthur, William , An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names. London: 1857. Print
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
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