Barratt History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

When the Strongbownians arrived in Ireland, they encountered an established Irish system for creating hereditary surnames. However, like the Irish, the Anglo-Norman Strongbownians frequently had patronymic surnames, a form of surname that was formed from the name of the bearer's father, or another older relative. Therefore, since the Strongbownians' system was in many ways built on the same principles as the Irish, the two systems eventually attained a sort of merger. Since the Stronbownian's names often had Norman names which were French, diminutive suffixes, such as -ot, -et, -un, -in, or -el were added to the name of the bearer's father, or older relative. Another Norman way of creating a patronymic name was to use the prefix Fitz-, which was derived from the French word "fils," and ultimately from the Latin " filius," both of which mean son. The surname Barratt is derived from the personal name Berold. In Munster, the Gaelic form of the surname Barratt is Baróid, while in Connacht, the Gaelic form is Bairéid.

Early Origins of the Barratt family

The surname Barratt was first found in Lincolnshire, where Matthew Baret was recorded between 1150 and 1155. The Barret family was also established in the English counties of Nottinghamshire, Hertfordshire, Hampshire, Yorkshire and Essex. However, they joined Strongbow in his invasion of Ireland in 1172 at the invitation of the King of Leinster, Dermot McMurrough. Strongbow granted lands to the family in County Cork and County Mayo where they became staunchly Irish.

Patrick Barret (d. 1415), was an Irish ecclesiastic and judge, one of the canons of the Augustinian abbey of Kells in Ossory, was consecrated Bishop of Ferns in Wexford by the Pope at Rome in December 1400. [1]

Not all of the family emigrated to Ireland, but today the name is better known there than in England. By example, "the manor of Ashton, or Ashtorre Barrett, in [the parish of St. Dominick, Cornwall], belonged for many generations to the ancient family of Barrett; but on failure of male issue it passed with an heiress in 1707 to the family of Prestwood." [2]

Early History of the Barratt family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Barratt research. Another 91 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1691, 1415, 1400, 1400, 1410, 1412, 1580, 1554, 1555, 1558, 1693, 1631 and 1713 are included under the topic Early Barratt History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Barratt Spelling Variations

Medieval scribes and church officials spelt names simply the way they sounded, which explains the various name spelling variations of the name Barratt that were encountered when researching that surname. The many spelling variations included: Barrett, Barret, Barett, Baret, Barratt, Barrat, Barat, Baratt, McWhadden and many more.

Early Notables of the Barratt family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family up to this time was Lord of Tirawley; Patrick Barrett (died 1415), an Irishman who held religious and secular high offices in Ireland, an Augustinian Canon at Kells Priory in County Kilkenny, Bishop of Ferns (appointed 1400), concentrated bishop at Rome (1400), Lord Chancellor of Ireland from 1410 to 1412. John Baret or Barret (d. 1580?), was an English lexicographer...
Another 63 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Barratt Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Barratt migration to the United States +

A great number of Irish families left their homeland in the late 18th century and throughout the 19th century, migrating to such far away lands as Australia and North America. The early settlers left after much planning and deliberation. They were generally well off but they desired a tract of land that they could farm solely for themselves. The great mass of immigrants to arrive on North American shores in the 1840s differed greatly from their predecessors because many of them were utterly destitute, selling all they had to gain a passage on a ship or having their way paid by a philanthropic society. These Irish people were trying to escape the aftermath of the Great Potato Famine: poverty, starvation, disease, and, for many, ultimately death. Those that arrived on North American shores were not warmly welcomed by the established population, but they were vital to the rapid development of the industry, agriculture, and infrastructure of the infant nations of the United States and what would become Canada. Early passenger and immigration lists reveal many Irish settlers bearing the name Barratt:

Barratt Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Thomas Barratt, aged 21, who arrived in Barbados in 1682 [3]
Barratt Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Antoine Barratt, who arrived in Louisiana in 1718 [3]
  • Philip Barratt, who arrived in Delaware in 1755 [3]
Barratt Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Robert Barratt, aged 23, who arrived in Mobile County, Ala in 1842 [3]

Australia Barratt migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Barratt Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. William Barratt, British convict who was convicted in Gloucester, England for life, transported aboard the "Henry Tanner" on 27th June 1834, settling in New South Wales, Australia [4]
  • James Barratt, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Diadem" in 1840 [5]
  • Ambrose Barratt, aged 47, a carpenter, who arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship "China" [6]

New Zealand Barratt migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Barratt Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • William Barratt, aged 33, a painter, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "London" in 1842
  • Mary Ann Barratt, aged 33, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "London" in 1842
  • Sarah Barratt, aged 7, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "London" in 1842
  • Caroline Barratt, aged 6, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "London" in 1842
  • William Barratt, aged 4, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "London" in 1842
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Barratt (post 1700) +

  • Michael Reed Barratt M.D., M.S. (b. 1959), NASA Astronaut with over 210 days in space [7]
  • Caleb R. Barratt, American Democrat politician, Postmaster at Salt Lake City, Utah, 1887-90, 1895-98 [8]
  • Ms. Susan Elizabeth Barratt B.E.M., British Governor for Castle Hill High School, was appointed Medallist of the British Empire Medal 29th December 2018 for services to Education [9]
  • Thomas J. Barratt (1841-1914), English Chairman of the soap manufacturer A&F Pears, a pioneer of brand marketing, he has been called "the father of modern advertising"
  • Thomas Ball Barratt (1862-1940), English-born, Norwegian pastor
  • Thomas Barratt (1895-1917), English recipient of the Victoria Cross
  • Norman Barratt (b. 1949), English guitarist and songwriter
  • Michael Barratt (b. 1928), British television presenter
  • Julian Barratt (b. 1968), English actor and musician
  • Fred Barratt (1894-1947), English cricketer
  • ... (Another 1 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMS Dorsetshire
  • James Barratt (d. 1945), British Stoker 1st Class aboard the HMS Dorsetshire when she was struck by air bombers and sunk; he died in the sinking [10]
RMS Titanic
  • Mr. Arthur Barratt (d. 1912), aged 15, English Bell Boy from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [11]


  1. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  2. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 7th January 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/henry-tanner
  5. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The barque DIADEM 1840. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1840Diadem.htm
  6. ^ South Australian Register Tuesday 3 February 1852. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) CHINA 1852. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/china1852.shtml
  7. ^ NASA Astronauts Homepage. (Retrieved 2010, September 27) Michael Barratt. Retrieved from http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/barratt-mr.html
  8. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 15) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  9. ^ "Birthday and New Year Honours Lists (1940 to 2019)." Issue 62507, 28 December 2018 | London Gazette, The Gazette, Dec. 2018, www.thegazette.co.uk/honours-lists
  10. ^ Force Z Survivors HMS Dorsetshire Crew List, (Retrieved 2018, February 13th), https://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listdorsetshirecrew.html
  11. ^ Titanic Passenger List - Titanic Facts. (Retrieved 2016, July 13) . Retrieved from http://www.titanicfacts.net/titanic-passenger-list.html


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