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Barbor History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The chronicles of Scottish history reveal that the first people to use the name Barbor were the Strathclyde- Britons. The Barbor surname is derived from the Anglo-Norman French word "barbier," in turn from the Late Latin "barbarius," or "barba, " meaning "beard." As such, the medieval barber who not only cut hair and gave shaves, but also practiced surgery and pulled teeth. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


Early Origins of the Barbor family


The surname Barbor was first found in Northumberland, and Cumberland. Some of the first records of the family were Gilbert le Barber or Barbour and Michael le Barber who were Scots prisoners taken at Dunbar Castle in 1296. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
The year 1296 is important to note as this was the year that King Edward I of England invaded Scotland. Those on the borders were deeply affected and those who refused to pay homage to the king were often thrown in jail.

However not all of the family failed to pay homage, as Aleyn le Barbur of the county of Arne did render homage to the invading king. Later in 1305, John Barbitonsor rendered the accounts for the farm of Mountros and a few years later, William Barbitonsor had confirmation of a charter of lands in 1317. The famed Robert Bruce granted to Ade Barbitonsor a toft in Moffat with two bovates of land adjoining (presumably the same year) and in 1328 there is entry of a payment to Andrew Barber. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


Early History of the Barbor family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Barbor research.
Another 180 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1410, 1603, 1329, 1336, 1383, 1391, 1410, 1451, 1463, 1934, 1316, 1395 and are included under the topic Early Barbor History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Barbor Spelling Variations


Surnames that evolved in Scotland in the Middle Ages often appear under many spelling variations. These are due to the practice of spelling according to sound in the era before dictionaries had standardized the English language. Barbor has appeared as Barbour, Barber, Barberton and others.

Early Notables of the Barbor family (pre 1700)


Another 50 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Barbor Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Barbor family to Ireland


Some of the Barbor family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 57 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Barbor family to the New World and Oceana


The North American colonies beckoned, with their ample land and opportunity as their freedom from the persecution suffered by so many Clan families back home. Many Scots even fought against England in the American War of Independence to gain this freedom. Recently, clan societies have allowed the ancestors of these brave Scottish settlers to rediscover their familial roots. Among them:

Barbor Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • James Barbor, who arrived in Maryland in 1671 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

The Barbor Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Nihilo nisi cruce
Motto Translation: Nothing, but the cross.


Barbor Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)


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