Amondvile History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Amondvile is an ancient Norman name that arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Amondvile family lived in Amondeville, near Caen. [1]

Early Origins of the Amondvile family

The surname Amondvile was first found in Lincolnshire where conjecturally, the surname is descended from the tenant of the lands of Kingerby, Auresby, Ellesham, and Croxton held by Roger de Amondeville from Caen in Normandy. [2]

"In Lincolnshire, for some unaccountable reason, the head of the family always bore the mysterious alias of Humfines. The first who came to England, Roger de Amondeville, "called also Humfines," was Seneschal to Remigius, Bishop of Lincoln (one of the compilers of Domesday), and by him endowed with four Lincolnshire manors, Kingerby, the principal seat of his successors, Auresby, Ellesham, and Croxton. He married a daughter of Sir Gerard Salvin, of Thorpe-Salvin in Yorkshire, and left, besides Jolland, his heir, John, and Robert. " [1]

Later some of the family branched to "the Yorkshire manor of Carlton. The Amondevilles had already an estate in that county; for Whitaker tells us that they were probably the first grantees of Preston-in-Craven under Robert de Poitou." [1]

"The name had not died out, either in Yorkshire or Lincolnshire; though the objectionable form of Humfines occurs no more; for Walter de Amundeville was for seven years Viscount of Lincoln in the early part of Henry III.'s reign; and Whitaker speaks of a Nigel de Amundeville who succeeded Elias in Craven, and was most likely his younger son. Ralph de Amundeville, before 1340, was one of the principal benefactors of Swine Priory, on condition the convent would receive his daughter as a nun." (Clevalend1)

Another branch existed in Warwickshire and Northamptonshire. Henry de Newburgh, the first Norman Earl of Warwick, enfeoffed Ralph de Amundeville at Lighthorne and Berkeswell, where he was seated in the time of Henry I. In 1122 he witnessed his suzerain's foundation charter of the collegiate church of Warwick.

Early History of the Amondvile family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Amondvile research. Another 115 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1510, 1600, 1179, 1256 and 1262 are included under the topic Early Amondvile History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Amondvile Spelling Variations

Endless spelling variations are a prevailing characteristic of Norman surnames. Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules, and the introduction of Norman French added an unfamiliar ingredient to the English linguistic stew. French and Latin, the languages of the court, also influenced spellings. Finally, Medieval scribes generally spelled words according to how they sounded, so one person was often referred to by different spellings in different documents. The name has been spelled Amondville, Amondvile, Amundvile, Amundville and others.

Early Notables of the Amondvile family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Richard Amundeville who in 1256 attended the Earl of Cornwall to Germany; and in 1262, was in the Welsh expedition under Prince Edward. In "Whether he did cordially adhere to the rebellious Barons shortly after, I will not take upon me to say; though plain it is that he was in Kenilworth Castle when the Royal army besieged it, and being reputed one of the Baron's partie, had safe conduct with Henry de Hastings and others, to march out upon the render thereof: yet so far...
Another 94 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Amondvile Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Amondvile family

To escape the political and religious persecution within England at the time, many English families left for the various British colonies abroad. The voyage was extremely difficult, though, and the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving. But for those who made it, the trip was most often worth it. Many of the families who arrived went on to make valuable contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families reveals a number of immigrants bearing the name Amondvile or a variant listed above: George Ammond, who was naturalized in Pennsylvania in 1744.



  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)


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