Wight History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The distinguished surname Wight came from England to Ireland in several different waves, beginning with the Anglo- Norman invasion of the 12th century. As an Irish name, this name has been used as a translation of various Gaelic names incorporating the Gaelic word, "bán," which means "white."

Early Origins of the Wight family

The surname Wight was first found in Ireland after the Anglo- Norman invasion of the 12th century, when Walter Whyte is known to have come to Ireland with 'Strongbow'. The earliest bearers of this name settled mostly in counties Down and Sligo (Irish: Sligeach), in the province of Connacht in Northwestern Ireland, where their names became MacWhite, MacFaoitigh, de Faoite and the like.

Early History of the Wight family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Wight research. Another 126 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1213, 1414, 1572, 1575, 1584, 1648, 1738, 1820, 1835, 1863, and 1893 are included under the topic Early Wight History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Wight Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Whyte, Wight, Whight, White, MacWhite, MacFaoitigh and many more.

Early Notables of the Wight family (pre 1700)

Another 42 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Wight Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Wight migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Wight Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Hannah Wight, who arrived at Watertown, Massachusetts in 1635-1636
  • Thomas Wight, who landed in Dedham, Massachusetts in 1639 [1]
  • Henry Wight, who arrived in New England in 1647 [1]
  • Marke Wight, who landed in Virginia in 1650 [1]
Wight Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Edward John Wight, age 17, who settled in Maryland in 1735
  • Elizabeth Wight, aged 21, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1775 [1]
Wight Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Walter Wight, aged 49, who arrived in New York in 1812 [1]
  • George Wight, who landed in New York in 1820 [1]
  • Matthew Wight, who arrived in New York in 1820 [1]

New Zealand Wight migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Wight Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • David Wight, aged 24, a carpenter, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Slains Castle" in 1841
  • Mary Wight, aged 27, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Slains Castle" in 1841
  • Isabella Wight, aged 8 months, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Slains Castle" in 1841
  • Mr. David Wight, (b. 1816), aged 24, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Slains Castle" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 25th January 1841 [2]
  • Mrs. Mary Wight, (b. 1813), aged 27, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Slains Castle" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 25th January 1841 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Wight (post 1700) +

  • William Wight, American Republican politician, Candidate for U.S. Representative from Washington 3rd District, 1988 [3]
  • Pearl Wight, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Louisiana, 1908; Member of Republican National Committee from Louisiana, 1908 [3]
  • Ira E. Wight Jr., American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Missouri, 1956 [3]
  • Fred W. Wight, American politician, U.S. Collector of Customs, 1909 [3]
  • Emerson Wight (1815-1890), American Republican politician, Mayor of Springfield, Massachusetts, 1875-78 [3]
  • Charles L. Wight, American politician, U.S. Consular Agent in Mahukona, 1882-95 [3]
  • Charles H. Wight, American Republican politician, Candidate for New York State Assembly from Kings County 11th District, 1904 [3]
  • Amherst Wight Jr., American politician, Member of New York State Assembly from Westchester County 2nd District, 1873-74 [3]
  • A. W. Wight, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from West Virginia, 1900 [3]
  • Paul Wight (b. 1972), American actor, known for his roles in WWE Smackdown! (1999), WWF Raw (1993) and The Waterboy (1998)
  • ... (Another 11 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)


The Wight Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Echel agus coruic
Motto Translation: The axle and coryg.


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 18) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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