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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2015

Where did the French Lebleu family come from? When did the Lebleu family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Lebleu family history?

The ancient roots of the Lebleu family are embedded in the coastal area known as Normandy. The name Lebleu comes from when a family lived person who was "blanc" or in English "white." It was no doubt originally given to someone either because of their blond hair or because of a reputation for purity and piety.

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There were a great number of spelling variations in French surnames. One reason for this was the wide variety of cultural influences present in France during the early development of the French language. The many spelling variations of the name include Leblanc, Lebland, Leblang, Le Blanc, Blanc, Blanche, Blanchet, Blancheteau, Blancheton, Blanchonnet, Blanchot, Blanchaud, Blanquet, Blancot, Bianchi, Blanchecappe, Blanchecotte, Le Blank, Blank, Blanque, Blanke, Blancke and many more.

First found in Normandy (French: Normandie), the former Duchy of Normandy, where this ancient family were part of the Royal House of Blois and held a family seat with lands, titles, estates and manors. Members of this family were the hereditary Barons of Bailleul of Norman Conquest fame, and who assisted Duke William of Normandy, head of the House of Blois, in his conquest of England in 1066. Members of this distinguished and Royal family branched to many locations throughout Europe and amongst the locations were: Silesia, Holland, Italy and Britain. Perhaps the oldest of the name was Blanche of Navarre (1226-1283), also known as Blanche of Champagne, was the daughter of Theobald the Troubador, King of Navarre and Count of Champagne, and his second wife Agnes of Beaujeu. Blanche of Navarre (French: Blanche d'Évreux) (1330-1398) was Queen consort of France as the wife of King Philip VI of France. Blanche I (1387-1441) was Queen of Navarre from 1425 to 1441 and her daughter Blanche II of Navarre (1424-1464), was titular Queen of Navarre (1461-1464) and by marriage Princess of Asturias.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Lebleu research. Another 255 words(18 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Lebleu History in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Another 67 words(5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Lebleu Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

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In the 1700s, land incentives were finally given out by France to 2,000 migrants. Early marriage was encouraged in New France, and youths of 18 took fourteen-year-old girls for their wives. The fur trade was developed and attracted migrants, both noble and commoner from France. 15,000 explorers left Montreal in the late 17th and 18th centuries, leaving French names scattered across the continent. The search for the Northwest passage continued. Migration from France to New France or Quebec, as it was now more popularly called, continued until 1759. By 1675, there were 7000 French in Quebec. By the same year the Acadian presence in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had reached 500. In the treaty of Utrecht, Acadia were ceded by France to Britain in 1713. In 1755, 10,000 French Acadians refused to take an oath of allegiance to England and were deported. They found refuge in Louisiana. Meanwhile, in Quebec, the French race flourished, founding in Lower Canada, one of the two great solitudes which became Canada. Many of this distinguished family name Lebleu were prominent in social, cultural, religious and political affairs in France and New France. Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name Lebleu were Anne, Catherine, Elizabeth, Desiré LeBlanc with his wife Marie, Jacques LeBlanc and with his wife Joseth, Simon LeBlanc with his wife Marie Joseph, and Jerome LeBlanc, who all settled in Oxford county in Quebec in 1763.

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  2. Conrad, Glenn R. The First Families of Louisiana. Baton Rouge LA: Claitor's Publishing, 1970. Print.
  3. Bentley, Elizabeth P. Passenger Arrivals at the Port of New York 1820-1829. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1999. Print.
  4. Doyle, William. The Oxford History of the French Revolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990. Print. (ISBN 0192852213).
  5. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  6. Rupp, Daniel L. A Collection of Upwards of Thirty Thousand Names of German, Swiss, Dutch, French and Other Immigrants to Pennsylvania from 1727 to 1776. Baltimore. Print.
  7. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
  8. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  9. Samuelsen, W. David. New York City Passenger List Manifests Index 1820 - 1824. North Salt Lake, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems International, 1986. Print.
  10. Annuaire Général Héraldique Universel. Paris: Institut Héraldique, 1901. Print.
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This page was last modified on 5 June 2015 at 09:08.

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