Willington History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Willington surname is classed as a habitation name; that is, one derived from a pre-existing place name. There are several places in various counties so named in Britain.

Early Origins of the Willington family

The surname Willington was first found in Burton, Yorkshire, where early records, including documents from the Burton Chartulary record Nicholas de Wilentona, in 1251. Willington in Derbyshire has an interesting story to tell about the family. "The property at the Domesday Survey belonged partly to the king, and partly to Ralph Fitzhubert. Henry II. gave one of the two manors to Burton Abbey. The other appears to have been given with the church, by the family of Willington, to the prior and convent of Repton." [1]

Much farther to the south in the parish of St. Pinnock, Cornwall, we found this interesting entry: "a manor called Trevillis, was, so early as the days of Richard II. in the family of Willington. It was afterwards in moieties, between (the families of Mohun and Hobartes, about the year 1620." [2]

Early History of the Willington family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Willington research. Another 118 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1662, 1330 and 1322 are included under the topic Early Willington History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Willington Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Willington, Wilington, Wilentona,Wilenton and others.

Early Notables of the Willington family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Willington Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Willington family to Ireland

Some of the Willington family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 31 words (2 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Willington migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Willington Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Mary Willington, who settled in Virginia in 1653
  • Michael Willington, who landed in Virginia in 1665 [3]
  • James Willington, who was on record in Virginia in 1691
  • Jane Willington, who settled in Virginia in 1699
  • Jane Willington who settled in Virginia in 1699
Willington Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • William Willington, who settled in Maryland in 1718
  • William Willington, who arrived in Charles Town, South Carolina in 1719
  • Thomas Willington, a bonded passenger to America in 1766
Willington Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • T A Willington, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851 [3]
  • Phillip A W Willington, who arrived in Mississippi in 1855 [3]

Australia Willington migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Willington Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Thomas Willington, (b. 1808), aged 22, English store keeper who was convicted in Warwick, Warwickshire, England for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Clyde" on 20th August 1830, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land), he died in 1884 [4]
  • Walter Willington, who arrived in Australia aboard the "Bangalore" in 1855
  • Mrs. Caroline Willington, (b. 1822), aged 36, Cornish general servant departing from Plymouth on 11th December 1857 aboard the ship "Sea Park " arriving in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on 20th March 1858 [5]
  • Miss Louisa Willington, (b. 1848), aged 10, Cornish settler departing from Plymouth on 11th December 1857 aboard the ship "Sea Park " arriving in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on 20th March 1858 [5]
  • Miss Elizabeth Willington, (b. 1850), aged 8, Cornish settler departing from Plymouth on 11th December 1857 aboard the ship "Sea Park " arriving in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on 20th March 1858 [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

West Indies Willington migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [6]
Willington Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • Mary Willington, who settled in Jamaica in 1684

Contemporary Notables of the name Willington (post 1700) +

  • James Willington, actor
  • Bernard Willington, painter
  • Ernest Willington Skeats (1875-1953), English-born, Australian geologist and academic, awarded the Clarke Medal in 1929, President of the Royal Society of Victoria 1910-1911


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 19th February 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/clyde
  5. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_victoria.pdf
  6. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies


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