Wilcoxen History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Wilcoxen family

The surname Wilcoxen was first found in Cumberland, where they held a family seat on the English/Scottish border. After the Norman Conquest of England many of Duke William's rebellious Barons moved north. The border became a convenient but turbulent no-man's land where the persecuted Many were given land by King Malcolm Canmore and later by King David of Scotland. Some were native Scots. In the 16th century they became known as the 'unruly clans'. The name was first recorded in England in Cumberland in 1332 when William Wilcokson held estates in that county.

Early History of the Wilcoxen family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Wilcoxen research. Another 70 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Wilcoxen History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Wilcoxen Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Wilcoxen, Wilcoxon, Wilcockson, Willcokson, Willcoxon and many more.

Early Notables of the Wilcoxen family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Wilcoxen Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Wilcoxen Ranking

In the United States, the name Wilcoxen is the 17,488th most popular surname with an estimated 2,487 people with that name. [1]

Migration of the Wilcoxen family

Some of the first settlers of this family name or some of its variants were: settlers who were recorded from the mid 17th century in the great migration from Europe to the New World. Migrants settled in the eastern seaboard from Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, to Maine, to Florida, and to the Leeward islands..


Contemporary Notables of the name Wilcoxen (post 1700) +

  • Patricia L. Wilcoxen, American Democratic Party politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1980 [2]
  • Mrs. J. C. Wilcoxen, American Republican politician, Member of West Virginia Republican State Executive Committee, 1941 [2]


The Wilcoxen Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Semper fidelis
Motto Translation: Always faithful.


  1. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 20) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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