Whyley History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

In ancient Scotland, the first people to use Whyley as a surname were the Strathclyde-Britons. It was a name someone who lived in Dumfries where today more often than not, the name is typically spelt either Wylie or Wyllie. [1]

Early Origins of the Whyley family

The surname Whyley was first found in Dumfriesshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Dhùn Phris), where the first on record was Donald Wyly, tenant of Thornhill, Dumfriesshire, 1376. Later, John Wili held a land in Montrose, 1431, and Robert Wylye was vicar of Kilcoldrum, 1434. William Wyly, was a witness in Prestwick, Ayrshire, 1446, Robert Wyly, was a charter witness in Glasgow, 1454, and Richard Wyly, was vicar of Dundee in 1458. [1]

Early History of the Whyley family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Whyley research. Another 218 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1509, 1529, 1530, 1550, 1563, 1575, 1653, 1659, 1680, 1590, 1645, 1642, 1643 and are included under the topic Early Whyley History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Whyley Spelling Variations

The origin of rules governing the spelling of names and even words is a very recent innovation. Before that, words and names were spelled according to sound, and, therefore, often appeared under several different spelling variations in a single document. Whyley has been spelled Wiley, Wylie, Whyley, Wyley, Wilie, Wyllie and others.

Early Notables of the Whyley family (pre 1700)

Another 37 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Whyley Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Whyley family to Ireland

Some of the Whyley family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 74 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Whyley migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Whyley Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Michael Whyley, English convict who was convicted in Chester, Cheshire, England for life, transported aboard the "Duke of Portland" in January 1807, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [2]
  • Mr. John Jones Whyley, English convict who was convicted in Warwick, Warwickshire, England for 15 years, transported aboard the "Emerald Isle" on 25th June 1842, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [3]


The Whyley Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fides
Motto Translation: Faith.


  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 28th July 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/duke-of-portland
  3. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 27th March 2022). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/emily


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