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Were History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Were is derived from the Old English word "wer" which meant a "weir, dam, fishing-trap" In other words, the family were "dwellers by a dam" or "keepers of the fishing-weir," or fishermen. Today in Britain, Weare and Lower Weare are small villages in Somerset, England, on the River Axe, south of the Mendip Hills. And in the United States, Weare, New Hampshire; and Weare Township, Michigan are listed.


Early Origins of the Were family


The surname Were was first found in Devon where one of the first records was Peter de la Were who was listed in a census in 1242 and John atte Were was listed in a Somerset census in 1332. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)

Traditionally, this family derive from an ancient branch of the Giffards of Devon and Somerset and are not related to the Weir of Vere families. Some say, in early times before the 12th century, the Weare-Giffards of Brightly and Halsworthy took the name Weare and eventually dropped the Giffard portion of the name.


Early History of the Were family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Were research.
Another 153 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1600, 1700, 1573, 1647, 1593, 1623 and are included under the topic Early Were History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Were Spelling Variations


Spelling variations of this family name include: Were, Where, Wear, Wears, Weare and others.

Early Notables of the Were family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Degory Wheare (1573-1647), English professor of history at Oxford University, born at the mansion of Berry Court, Jacobstow, about eight miles south of Stratton in North Cornwall. "He matriculated from Broadgates Hall, Oxford, on 6...
Another 42 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Were Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Were family to Ireland


Some of the Were family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 60 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Were family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Were Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Elizabeth Were, who settled in Pennsylvania in 1771

Were Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Mr. William Were, (b. 1816), aged 25, Cornish labourer travelling aboard the ship "George Fife" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 23rd July 1841 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, May 30). Ships' Passenger Lists of Arrivals in New South Wales on (1828 - 1842, 1848 - 1849) [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_nsw_1838_on.pdf
  • Mrs. Harriett Were, (b. 1820), aged 21, Cornish dairymaid travelling aboard the ship "George Fife" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 23rd July 1841 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, May 30). Ships' Passenger Lists of Arrivals in New South Wales on (1828 - 1842, 1848 - 1849) [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_nsw_1838_on.pdf
  • Mr. William Were, (b. 1816), aged 25, Cornish labourer departing from Plymouth aboard the ship "George Fyfe" arriving in Port Phillip, Victoria, Australia on 23rd July 1841 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retreived 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_victoria.pdf
  • Mrs. Harriett Were, (b. 1820), aged 21, Cornish dairy woman departing from Plymouth aboard the ship "George Fyfe" arriving in Port Phillip, Victoria, Australia on 23rd July 1841 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retreived 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_victoria.pdf
  • James Were, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Bussorah Merchant" in 1848 [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) BUSSORAH MERCHANT 1848. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1848BussorahMerchant.htm
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Were (post 1700)


  • Cecil Allan Walter Were CMG, British Consul General of Bale, Retired, London, England
  • Thomas Were Fox Jr., American politician, U.S. Consular Agent in Plymouth, 1859-70; U.S. Consul in Plymouth, 1884-97 [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 9) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Thomas Were Fox, American politician, U.S. Consular Agent in Plymouth, 1823-59 [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 9) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Robert Were Fox Jr., American politician, U.S. Consul in Falmouth, 1819-54 [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 9) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Robert Were Fox (b. 1818), American politician, U.S. Consul in Falmouth, 1794-1818 [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 9) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

The Were Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fuimus
Motto Translation: God and my country.


Were Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, May 30). Ships' Passenger Lists of Arrivals in New South Wales on (1828 - 1842, 1848 - 1849) [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_nsw_1838_on.pdf
  3. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retreived 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_victoria.pdf
  4. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) BUSSORAH MERCHANT 1848. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1848BussorahMerchant.htm
  5. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, February 9) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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