Wargent History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Wargent is an ancient Norman name that arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Wargent family lived in Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire in the south of England, where they held lands since the early Middle Ages. The family were "from the town and castle of Argenton, Berry, held in 1080 be Geoffroi, Sire d'Argenton, whose descendants continued there for twelve generations. David d'Argenton (perhaps his brother) held lands de capite in Cambridgeshire and Bedfordshire. [1] He is styled David de Argentomago or Argentomo; but the name gradually lapsed to Argentein or Argentine. His manor or Wymondley in Cambridgeshire was held by grand serjeanty, 'to serve the King on his coronation day with a silver cup'; and the English Argentines consequently substituted three covered cups to the torteauxes that had been borne by their ancestors in France." [2]

Early Origins of the Wargent family

The surname Wargent was first found in Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire in the south of England. "The descendants of this Norman chieftain, David de Argentine, became feudal barons of great personal distinction. Reginald de Argentine, who appears to have been fifth in descent from the companion in arms of the Conqueror, succeeded all his father Giles de Argentine's vast estates, including the manor of Great Wymondeley, in Cambridgeshire. Of the same ancestry was Reginald de Argentine, who, in the 21 Henry III being a knight templar, was standard bearer of the Christian army in a great battle against the Turks, near Antioch, wherein he was slain." [3]

Other early records include Geoffrey Argent was listed in the Pipe Rolls of Northamptonshire in 1180. The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list: Richard de Arengtein in Hertfordshire and Reginald de Argente in Essex. Reginald de Argentein was listed in the Feet of Fines in Norfolk in 1281. [4]

"A branch of the Argentines was seated in Yorkshire, where William, the son of Robert, held one knight's fee of Percy early in the reign of Henry I. Walter de Argentoun was the first husband of Aaliza de Percy; and their son Roger left three co-heiresses; Agnes, Asmota, and Elizabeth." [2]

Early History of the Wargent family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Wargent research. Another 63 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1507, 1625, 1649 and 1568 are included under the topic Early Wargent History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Wargent Spelling Variations

Norman surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. The frequent changes in surnames are largely due to the fact that the Old and Middle English languages lacked definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England, as well as the official court languages of Latin and French, also had pronounced influences on the spelling of surnames. Since medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, rather than adhering to any specific spelling rules, it was common to find the same individual referred to with different spellings. The name has been spelled Argent, Argentine, Argenton, Argente and others.

Early Notables of the Wargent family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was John Argentine (died 1507), an English physician who attended Edward V of England and later Arthur, Prince of Wales and was Provost of King's College, Cambridge; John Argent, who was a "Doctor of Physic,"...
Another 41 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Wargent Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Wargent migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Wargent Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. William Wargent, British Convict who was convicted in Hereford, England for 15 years, transported aboard the "Asia" on 25th April 1840, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [5]


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3
  3. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 17th January 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/asia/1840


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