Taylby History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Norman Conquest of England in 1066 brought much change to the island nation, including many immigrants with new names. Among these immigrants were the ancestors of the Taylby family, who lived in Lincolnshire. Their name, however, is a reference to Taillebois, Normandy, the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. Alternatively, the name may be derived from the Old French "taillebosc," meaning "cut wood"; in this case, the name would refer to a wood-cutter. [1]

"The surname occurs frequently in Domesday. Ivo Tailgebosch, Lord of Holland, co. Lincoln, married Lucia, sister of the Saxon Earls Edwin and Morcar; and Ralph and Ivo Tailgebosc, Tallebosc, &c., were tenants in Bedfordshire. Other corruptions of this name are Tailboys, Tabois, and Tailbush." [2]

Early Origins of the Taylby family

The surname Taylby was first found in Lincolnshire, where "Ivo Tailgebosch, Lord of Holland, married Lucia, sister of the Saxon Earls Edwin and Morcar. " [2]

"Ivo Taillebois—evidently a cadet of the same house, was Chamberlain to Robert de Vipont, Lord of Westmorland, in the time of King John, and in 1206 obtained the Royal license to marry the widow of William Bardolph, Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of William Fitz William, Lord of Cokedale in Northumberland. Among other possessions, he held Hurworth-on-Tees, co. Durham, in her right; and their son again married an heiress. The next, Lucas, Sheriff of Northumberland in 1300, was the grandfather of Henry Tailboys, whose wife Eleanor, daughter and heir of Gilbert de Boroden, brought into the family the lion's share of the great heritage of the Umfrevilles." [3]

Early History of the Taylby family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Taylby research. Another 204 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1000, 1386, 1477, 1513, 1570, 1768, 1464, 1417, 1417, 1421, 1530, 1467, 1517, 1509, 1513 and 1517 are included under the topic Early Taylby History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Taylby Spelling Variations

Before the last few hundred years the English language had no fixed system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations occurred commonly in Anglo Norman surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Taylby were recorded, including Tallboys, Tailboys, Tailby, Talpy, Tailbois and many more.

Early Notables of the Taylby family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir William Talboys or Tailboys, Earl of Kyme (d. 1464), born before 1417, son and heir of Walter Tailboys of Kyme in Lincolnshire. "Through the families of Barradon and Umfraville he represented the Kymes, lords of Kyme, and was in the male line a descendant of Ivo de Taillebois, a Norman invader, who received large grants in Lincolnshire from William I. William Tailboys was born before 1417, and...
Another 76 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Taylby Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Taylby family

The unstable environment in England at this time caused numerous families to board ships and leave in search of opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad in places like Ireland, Australia, and particularly the New World. The voyage was extremely difficult, however, and only taken at great expense. The cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels caused many to arrive diseased and starving, not to mention destitute from the enormous cost. Still opportunity in the emerging nations of Canada and the United States was far greater than at home and many went on to make important contributions to the cultures of their adopted countries. An examination of many early immigration records reveals that people bearing the name Taylby arrived in North America very early: John Talby, who immigrated to Salem, Massachusetts in 1639; Stephen Talby, who came to Boston in 1658; Mary Talpy and her husband, who settled in Boston, Massachusetts in 1735.



  1. ^ Charnock, Richard, Stephen, Ludus Patronymicus of The Etymology of Curious Surnames. London: Trubner & Co., 60 Paternoster Row, 1868. Print.
  2. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3


Houseofnames.com on Facebook