Tagee History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Tagee family

The surname Tagee was first found in Oxfordshire at Tackley, a parish, in the union of Woodstock, hundred of Wootton. [1] The place name dates back to the Domesday Book of 1086 when it was first listed as Tachelie. [2]

Literally the place name means "woodland clearing of a man called Taecca, or where young sheep are kept," derived from the Old English personal name or from the Old English "tacca" + "leah." [3]

William the Conqueror granted the manor of Tackley to Hugh d'Avranches, 1st Earl of Chester. The family was first recorded in the area during the reign of Edward I. [4]

The first listing in early rolls was Sanson Tachel, who in 1165, held a knight's fee of the old feoffment of Roger de Moubray in Yorkshire [5] and four and a half of his Lincolnshire fief [6].

John Takel held at Traneby, in the East Riding or Yorkshire [7]. Beatrix, daughter of Gilbert Thakel, was the wife of William de Wentworth of Wentworth-Woodhouse (acquired by his father through an heiress in the time of Henry III.), and the mother of two sons: 1. William, ancestor of the Earls of Strafford; and 2. Richard, Bishop of London and Chancellor of England in 1338. [8]

About 1272, Magister Galfrid Takel, Simon Thakel, and Ralph Thakel all occur in the same county: and Alan, Benedict, Matthew, and Robert Takel in Oxfordshire. - Rotuli Hundredorum. The latter was Marshal of Woodstock in 1280: and more than a hundred years after that, a Robert Takel was Prior of Rosedale in Yorkshire. A third Robert, Rector of Marsh-Gibbon in Cambridgeshire, died in 1479. [8]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 also included: William de Takeleye, Essex; Agnes de Takele, Oxfordshire; Robert de Takkele, Oxfordshire; and Willani de Tackeleg, Essex. [9]

Early History of the Tagee family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Tagee research. Another 142 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1200, 1273, 1325, 1529, 1194 and 1202 are included under the topic Early Tagee History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Tagee Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence in the eras before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate regularly changed the spellings of their names as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Tagee have been found, including Tackley, Takely, Takly, Tackly, Takel, Tackell and many more.

Early Notables of the Tagee family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Tagee Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Tagee family

For many English families, the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. For such families, the shores of Ireland, Australia, and the New World beckoned. They left their homeland at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. Many arrived after the long voyage sick, starving, and without a penny. But even those were greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. Numerous English settlers who arrived in the United States and Canada at this time went on to make important contributions to the developing cultures of those countries. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Tagee were among those contributors: the name represented in many forms and recorded from the mid 17th century in the great migration from Europe. Migrants settled in the eastern seaboard from Newfoundland, to Maine, to Virginia, the Carolinas, and to the islands..



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  4. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  5. ^ Liber Niger Scutarii ("Black Book of the Exchequer"), containing reports by county on feudal holdings in England in 1166 (reign of Henry II)
  6. ^ Testa de Nevill or "Liber Feodorum" or "Book of Fees," thought to have been written by Ralph de Nevill, for King John (1199–1216)
  7. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  8. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3
  9. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


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