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Swally History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Swally is a name that first reached England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Swally family lived in Yorkshire, at Swale.


Early Origins of the Swally family


The surname Swally was first found in Yorkshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor of Swale from ancient times. Although the Manor does not appear in the Domesday Book in 1086 the first recorded date is of John Swale who held the Lordship. He married Alice, daughter of Gilbert de Gaunt, and related to John of Gaunt about 1150.

At this time he held the manor of West Grenton or Grinton in Swaledale. South Stainley in the West Riding of Yorkshire was an ancient family seat. "This place was the property of Sir Solomon Swale, who suffered severely for his loyalty during the parliamentary war, and was presented with the first baronetcy conferred after the Restoration. Sir Solomon, in those unsettled times, having neglected to sue out a renewal of the lease by which he held some property under the crown, a chancery clerk, noticing the omission, obtained it for himself, and involved the Baronet in a litigation which, in a few years, ended in his becoming a prisoner in the king's bench, where he died of a broken heart. Stainley Hall, the ancient family seat, is now a ruin." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Early History of the Swally family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Swally research.
Another 86 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 166 and 1660 are included under the topic Early Swally History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Swally Spelling Variations


It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Swally are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Swally include S Wales, Swale, Swalles, Swaile, Swailles, Swailes and many more.

Early Notables of the Swally family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Swally Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Swally family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Swally Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Mr. Daniel Swally who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Lady Milton" departing 5th May 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 26th June 1847 but he died on board [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 97)

The Swally Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Jesu, esto mihi Jesus
Motto Translation: Jesus, be my Savior


Swally Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 97)


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