Stace History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Strongbownian invaders added their Norman conventions for surnames to the previously established Irish system for hereditary surnames. One of the most frequent forms of surnames for both cultures was the patronymic surname, which was formed from the name of the bearer's father or grandfather. The Norman tradition that the followers of Strongbow brought with them created such a surname through diminutive suffixes such as "-ot," "-et," "-un," "-in," or "-el." Occasionally, two suffixes were combined to form a double diminutive, as in the combinations of "-el-in," "-el-ot," "-in-ot," and "-et-in." The Normans also formed patronymic surnames in a manner very similar to the Irish: they added a prefix to their father's name. These Anglo-Norman people, however, used the prefix Fitz-, which was derived from the French word "fils," and ultimately from the Latin "filius," which both mean "son." Although this prefix probably originated in Flanders or Normandy, it can now only be found in Ireland. The surname Stace is derived from the personal name Eustace. This name is derived from the Latin name "Eustacius," which in turn is derived from the distinct Greek names "Eustakhios," which means "fruitful," and "Eustathios," which means "orderly."

Early Origins of the Stace family

The surname Stace was first found in County Meath, Wicklow and Wexford. They were Barons of Meath and later became the Viscounts Baltinglass.

Early History of the Stace family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Stace research. Another 166 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1200, 1639, and 1702 are included under the topic Early Stace History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Stace Spelling Variations

Medieval scribes and church officials spelt names simply the way they sounded, which explains the various name spelling variations of the name Stace that were encountered when researching that surname. The many spelling variations included: FitzEustace, Eustace, Eustice, Eustis, Stacy, Stacey, Stasey, Stacie, Stacie, Staicey, Staycey and many more.

Early Notables of the Stace family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Stace Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Stace migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Stace Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Sarah Stace, who arrived in Kangaroo Island aboard the ship "Hartley" in 1837 [1]

New Zealand Stace migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Stace Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Daniel Stace, aged 18, a farm labourer, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Forfarshire" in 1873 [2]
  • John Stace, aged 30, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Forfarshire" in 1873 [2]
  • Jacob Stace, aged 39, a labourer, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Conflict" in 1874
  • Ann Stace, aged 40, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Conflict" in 1874
  • Esther Stace, aged 6, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Conflict" in 1874
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Stace (post 1700) +

  • Aileen Mary Stace (1895-1977), New Zealand craftswoman, spinner and spinning teacher
  • Helen McRae Stace (1850-1926), New Zealand homemaker and school matron
  • Walter Terence Stace (1886-1967), British civil servant, educator, public philosopher and epistemologist


The Stace Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cur me persequeris?
Motto Translation: Why persecutest thou me?.


  1. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) HARTLEY 1837. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1837Hartley.htm
  2. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 6th November 2011). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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