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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


The Strongbownian invaders added their Norman conventions for surnames to the previously established Irish system for hereditary surnames. One of the most frequent forms of surnames for both cultures was the patronymic surname, which was formed from the name of the bearer's father or grandfather. The Norman tradition that the followers of Strongbow brought with them created such a surname through diminutive suffixes such as "-ot," "-et," "-un," "-in," or "-el." Occasionally, two suffixes were combined to form a double diminutive, as in the combinations of "-el-in," "-el-ot," "-in-ot," and "-et-in." The Normans also formed patronymic surnames in a manner very similar to the Irish: they added a prefix to their father's name. These Anglo-Norman people, however, used the prefix Fitz-, which was derived from the French word "fils," and ultimately from the Latin " filius," which both mean "son." Although this prefix probably originated in Flanders or Normandy, it can now only be found in Ireland. The surname Stace is derived from the personal name Eustace. This name is derived from the Latin name "Eustacius," which in turn is derived from the distinct Greek names "Eustakhios," which means "fruitful," and "Eustathios," which means "orderly."

Stace Early Origins



The surname Stace was first found in County Meath, Wicklow and Wexford. They were Barons of Meath and later became the Viscounts Baltinglass.

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Stace Spelling Variations


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Stace Spelling Variations



Medieval scribes and church officials spelt names simply the way they sounded, which explains the various name spelling variations of the name Stace that were encountered when researching that surname. The many spelling variations included: FitzEustace, Eustace, Eustice, Eustis, Stacy, Stacey, Stasey, Stacie, Stacie, Staicey, Staycey and many more.

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Stace Early History


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Stace Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Stace research. Another 386 words (28 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1200, 1639, and 1702 are included under the topic Early Stace History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Stace Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Stace Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Stace Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Stace Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Sarah Stace arrived in Kangaroo Island aboard the ship "Hartley" in 1837 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) HARTLEY 1837. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1837Hartley.htm

Stace Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Daniel Stace, aged 18, a farm labourer, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Forfarshire" in 1873
  • John Stace, aged 30, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Forfarshire" in 1873
  • Jacob Stace, aged 39, a labourer, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Conflict" in 1874
  • Ann Stace, aged 40, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Conflict" in 1874
  • Esther Stace, aged 6, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Conflict" in 1874
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

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Contemporary Notables of the name Stace (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Stace (post 1700)



  • Aileen Mary Stace (1895-1977), New Zealand craftswoman, spinner and spinning teacher
  • Helen McRae Stace (1850-1926), New Zealand homemaker and school matron
  • Walter Terence Stace (1886-1967), British civil servant, educator, public philosopher and epistemologist

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cur me persequeris?
Motto Translation: Why persecutest thou me?.


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Stace Family Crest Products


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Stace Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) HARTLEY 1837. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1837Hartley.htm

Other References

  1. Shaw, William A. Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, Ireland and Knights Bachelors 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print. (ISBN 080630443X).
  2. Hickey, D.J. and J.E. Doherty. A New Dictionary of Irish History form 1800 2nd Edition. Dublin: Gil & MacMillian, 2003. Print.
  3. Magnusson, Magnus. Chambers Biographical Dictionary 5th edition. Edinburgh: W & R Chambers, 1990. Print.
  4. Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Galveston Texas 1896-1951. National Archives Washington DC. Print.
  5. Fitzgerald, Thomas W. Ireland and Her People A Library of Irish Biography 5 Volumes. Chicago: Fitzgerald. Print.
  6. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
  7. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  8. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
  9. Woodham-Smith, Cecil. The Great Hunger Ireland 1845-1849. New York: Old Town Books, 1962. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-385-3).
  10. Leyburn, James Graham. The Scotch-Irish A Social History. Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 1962. Print. (ISBN 0807842591).
  11. ...

The Stace Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Stace Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 19 August 2014 at 09:07.

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