Simoneau History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Similar to many French family names, the distinguished surname Simoneau is a proud sign of a rich and ancient ancestry. The earliest forms of hereditary surnames in France were the patronymic surnames, which are derived from the father's given name, and metronymic surnames, which are derived from the mother's given name. The patronyms were derived from a variety of given names that were of many different origins. As well as the names of the saints of the Christian Church, many of the most common French surnames are derived from personal names of Germanic origin. They derive from the language of the Visigoths, who controlled France between the mid-5th and early 8th centuries. Simoneau is derived from the Hebrew personal name Shim'on, meaning to hearken.

Early Origins of the Simoneau family

The surname Simoneau was first found in Lorraine where they held a family seat and are said to be descended from the first French Simon or Sigismond, the Duke of Lorraine, 1115 A.D. who was succeeded by Simon II in 1179. There is also some distant relationship to Simond, King of Bourgogne. Robert Simon is cited as a knight in 1169. [1]

This prolific family dispersed to many parts of France including Kerbringal, Val-au-Houlle, Vallemoisan, Villeneuve and Ligou in Brittany, Plainmarais in Normandie, Quirielle in Bourbonnais, Maine, Laval, Montillemart and Ratisbone. Abbot Honoré-Richard Simon was a noted researcher who died in 1693. Richard Simon was a celebrated orator who died in 1712. Denis Simon was a noted jurist who died in 1731. Antoine Simon was guardian of the dauphin Louis XVII at Temple Prison in 1793. In Britain this surname Simon became the family name of the Viscounts and Barons Simon.

Gregoire Simon, born in 1631, son of Jean and Simone (née Bancherelle), travelled to Canada in the 17th century. He married Jeanne Collet, born in 1645, daughter of Michel and Marie (née Henaut), in Montreal, Quebec on 31st December 1668. They settled together in Montreal until they passed away on 8th May 1691. [2]

Early History of the Simoneau family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Simoneau research. More information is included under the topic Early Simoneau History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Simoneau Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Simon, Simond, Simmon, Simmond, Simeon, Simmeon, Simian, Simiane, Simmiane, Simmian, Le Simon, Simmonde, Simonde, Simont, Simonte, De Simon, Du Simon, du Simon, de Simon, Simons, Simmonne, Simmonet and many more.

Early Notables of the Simoneau family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Simoneau Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Simoneau World Ranking

In the United States, the name Simoneau is the 8,349th most popular surname with an estimated 2,487 people with that name. [3] However, in Quebec, Canada, the name Simoneau is ranked the 408th most popular surname. [4] And in France, the name Simoneau is the 6,245th popular surname with an estimated 1,000 - 1,500 people with that name. [5]


United States Simoneau migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Simoneau Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Louis Simoneau, aged 46, who settled in America from Paris, France, in 1913
  • Prosper Simoneau, who immigrated to the United States, in 1919
  • Edouard Simoneau, aged 25, who settled in America, in 1919
  • George Simoneau, aged 43, who landed in America, in 1920
  • George C. Simoneau, aged 42, who immigrated to the United States, in 1921
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Simoneau migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Simoneau Settlers in Canada in the 17th Century
  • Simon-René Simoneau, who married Jeanne Moreau, daughter of Jean and Anne, in Quebec in 1698 [6]
Simoneau Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • René Simoneau, son of René and Jeanne, who married Françoise-Geneviève Lambert, daughter of Jean-Aubin and Marie-Anne, in Saint-Nicolas, Quebec on 4th February 1727 [6]
  • Jean-Baptiste Simoneau, son of René and Jeanne, who married Marie-Anne Vermet, daughter of Robert and Marie-Madeleine, in Berthier, Quebec on 24th November 1727 [6]
  • Pierre Simoneau, son of René and Jeanne, who married Angélique Boilodeau, daughter of Antoine and Angélique, in Berthier, Quebec on 25th October 1735 [6]
  • Michel Simoneau, son of René and Jeanne, who married Angélique Renaud, daughter of Pierre and Marie, in Saint-Nicolas, Quebec on 7th January 1737 [6]
  • Charles Simoneau, son of René and Jeanne, who married Marguerite Vermet, daughter of Robert and Marguerite, in Berthier, Quebec on 18th January 1740 [6]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Simoneau (post 1700) +

  • Edward Thomas Simoneau (b. 1890), American politician, Mayor of Marlborough, Massachusetts
  • Daniel Owen "Dan" Simoneau (1959-1982), American cross country skier who competed at the 1982 and 1984 Winter Olympics
  • Léopold Simoneau CC CQ (1916-2006), French-Canadian lyric tenor, first recipient of the Calixa-Lavallée Award
  • Yves Simoneau (b. 1955), Canadian film and television director


The Simoneau Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: C'est mon plaisir
Motto Translation: It is my pleasure.


  1. ^ Hozier, Charles D, and Antoine Bachelin-Delforenne. État présent De La Noblesse française (1883-1887): Contenant Le Distionnaire De La Noblesse Contemporaine Et Larmorial général De France, Dapres Les Manuscrits De Ch. D Hozier. Librairie Des Bibliophiles, 1884. Print.
  2. ^ Olivier, Reginald L. Your Ancient Canadian Family Ties. Logan: The Everton Publishers, Inc., P.O. Box 368, 1972. Print
  3. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  4. ^ https://statistique.quebec.ca/fr/document/noms-de-famille-au-quebec/tableau/les-1-000-premiers-noms-de-famille-selon-le-rang-quebec
  5. ^ http://www.journaldesfemmes.com/nom-de-famille/nom/
  6. ^ Internoscia, Arthur E., and Claire Chevrier. Dictionnaire National des Canadiens Français 1608-1760. Vol. 2, Institut Drouin, 1958.


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