Simien History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Similar to many French family names, the distinguished surname Simien is a proud sign of a rich and ancient ancestry. The earliest forms of hereditary surnames in France were the patronymic surnames, which are derived from the father's given name, and metronymic surnames, which are derived from the mother's given name. The patronyms were derived from a variety of given names that were of many different origins. As well as the names of the saints of the Christian Church, many of the most common French surnames are derived from personal names of Germanic origin. They derive from the language of the Visigoths, who controlled France between the mid-5th and early 8th centuries. Simien is derived from the Hebrew personal name Shim'on, meaning to hearken.

Early Origins of the Simien family

The surname Simien was first found in Lorraine where they held a family seat and are said to be descended from the first French Simon or Sigismond, the Duke of Lorraine, 1115 A.D. who was succeeded by Simon II in 1179. There is also some distant relationship to Simond, King of Bourgogne. Robert Simon is cited as a knight in 1169. [1]

This prolific family dispersed to many parts of France including Kerbringal, Val-au-Houlle, Vallemoisan, Villeneuve and Ligou in Brittany, Plainmarais in Normandie, Quirielle in Bourbonnais, Maine, Laval, Montillemart and Ratisbone. Abbot Honoré-Richard Simon was a noted researcher who died in 1693. Richard Simon was a celebrated orator who died in 1712. Denis Simon was a noted jurist who died in 1731. Antoine Simon was guardian of the dauphin Louis XVII at Temple Prison in 1793. In Britain this surname Simon became the family name of the Viscounts and Barons Simon.

Gregoire Simon, born in 1631, son of Jean and Simone (née Bancherelle), travelled to Canada in the 17th century. He married Jeanne Collet, born in 1645, daughter of Michel and Marie (née Henaut), in Montreal, Quebec on 31st December 1668. They settled together in Montreal until they passed away on 8th May 1691. [2]

Early History of the Simien family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Simien research. More information is included under the topic Early Simien History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Simien Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Simon, Simond, Simmon, Simmond, Simeon, Simmeon, Simian, Simiane, Simmiane, Simmian, Le Simon, Simmonde, Simonde, Simont, Simonte, De Simon, Du Simon, du Simon, de Simon, Simons, Simmonne, Simmonet and many more.

Early Notables of the Simien family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Simien Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Simien migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Simien Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Justyna Simien, aged 21, originally from Lowczyce, Austria, who arrived in New York in 1911 aboard the ship "Cleveland" from Hamburg, Germany [3]
  • Flores Simien, aged 24, who arrived in New York in 1923 aboard the ship "Kroonland" from Havana, Cuba [4]

Contemporary Notables of the name Simien (post 1700) +

  • Tracy Anthony Simien (b. 1967), former professional American football linebacker
  • Terrance Simien (b. 1965), American zydeco musician, vocalist and song writer
  • Wayne Anthony Simien Jr. (b. 1983), American former professional basketball player
  • Jean-Louis Simien, French Brigadier General during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars from 1789 to 1815 [5]
  • William Simien (b. 1973), Canadian professional ice hockey player


The Simien Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: C'est mon plaisir
Motto Translation: It is my pleasure.


  1. ^ Hozier, Charles D, and Antoine Bachelin-Delforenne. État présent De La Noblesse française (1883-1887): Contenant Le Distionnaire De La Noblesse Contemporaine Et Larmorial général De France, Dapres Les Manuscrits De Ch. D Hozier. Librairie Des Bibliophiles, 1884. Print.
  2. ^ Olivier, Reginald L. Your Ancient Canadian Family Ties. Logan: The Everton Publishers, Inc., P.O. Box 368, 1972. Print
  3. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJ2C-JZ4 : 6 December 2014), Justyna Simien, 27 Jun 1911; citing departure port Hamburg, arrival port New York, ship name Cleveland, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNDD-G2G : 6 December 2014), Flores Simien, 28 Nov 1923; citing departure port Havana, arrival port New York, ship name Kroonland, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  5. ^ Generals Who Served in the French Army during the Period 1789-1815. (Retrieved 2015, October 8) Jean-Louis Simien. Retrieved from http://www.napoleon-series.org/research/c_frenchgenerals.html


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