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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


The tale of the Sime name began in the medieval era among the Boernician people of the Scottish/English Borderlands. Sime comes from Simon, and meant son of Simon.

Sime Early Origins



The surname Sime was first found in East Lothian, where they held a family seat from very ancient times.

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Sime Spelling Variations


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Sime Spelling Variations



Since medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, and since there were no consistent rules for the translation of rules from Gaelic to English, spelling variations are extremely common in Boernician names of this vintage. Sime has been spelled Simms, Symes, Sime, Simes, Sim, Sym, Syms, Syme and others.

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Sime Early History


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Sime Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Sime research. Another 188 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1162, 1503, 1530, and 1596 are included under the topic Early Sime History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Sime Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Sime Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Sime Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Sime In Ireland


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Sime In Ireland



Some of the Sime family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 233 words (17 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Many of the Boernician-Scottish families who crossed the Atlantic settled along the eastern seaboard in communities that would become the backbone of the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. In the War of Independence, American families that remained loyal to the Crown moved north into Canada and became known as United Empire Loyalists. The ancestral culture of all of these proud Scottish families remains alive in North America in the 20th century through Clan societies and highland games. Early North American immigration records have revealed a number of people bearing the name Sime or a variant listed above:

Sime Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • C Sime, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Sime Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Peter Sime, aged 22, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Forth" in 1833
  • William Sime, aged 21, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Forth" in 1833
  • John Sime, aged 16, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Forth" in 1833
  • David Sime, aged 14, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Forth" in 1833
  • Jane Sime, aged 8, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Forth" in 1833

Sime Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • James Sime, aged 26, a wright, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1841
  • Jamet Sime, aged 27, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1841
  • Mary Sime, aged 5, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1841
  • James Sime, aged 3, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1841
  • Janet Sime, aged 4 months, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1841

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Contemporary Notables of the name Sime (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Sime (post 1700)



  • David William "Dave" Sime (1936-2016), American silver medalist sprinter at the 1960 Summer Olympics

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fortuna et labore
Motto Translation: By fortune and labor.


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Sime Family Crest Products


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Sime Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Other References

  1. Bolton, Charles Knowles. Scotch Irish Pioneers In Ulster and America. Montana: Kessinger Publishing. Print.
  2. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  3. Magnusson, Magnus. Chambers Biographical Dictionary 5th edition. Edinburgh: W & R Chambers, 1990. Print.
  4. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and Don Pottinger. Clan Map Scotland of Old. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1983. Print.
  5. Bell, Robert. The Book of Ulster Surnames. Belfast: Blackstaff, 1988. Print. (ISBN 10-0856404160).
  6. Catholic Directory For Scotland. Glasgow: Burns Publications. Print.
  7. Shaw, William A. Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, Ireland and Knights Bachelors 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print. (ISBN 080630443X).
  8. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
  9. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
  10. Urquhart, Blair Edition. Tartans The New Compact Study Guide and Identifier. Secauccus, NJ: Chartwell Books, 1994. Print. (ISBN 0-7858-0050-6).
  11. ...

The Sime Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Sime Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 1 May 2016 at 22:28.

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