Savige History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Savige family

The surname Savige was first found in Cheshire at Barrow, a parish, in the union of Great Boughton, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury. "[Barrow] consists of Great and Little Barrow. It was given by Ranulph, Earl of Chester, to his nephew William de Albini, Earl of Arundel. The two manors were at a later period possessed by the Despencers, and, after their attainder, were granted by Edward III. to Sir Roger de Swinerton, an heiress of whose family brought them, in marriage, to Sir John Savage, who was knighted by Henry V. at the battle of Agincourt." [1]

"Savage is an ancient Gloucestershire name, which was represented as Savage or Sauvage in this county as well as in Wilts, in the reign of Edward I. In that reign it was also numerous in one form or the other in Cambridgeshire and Norfolk, where it is still established." [2]

"This surname is derived from a nickname. 'the savage.'" [3]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list: Walter Salvage in Oxfordshire: and Robert le Savage in Suffolk. The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 list: Beatrix Sawage; and Robertus Sawfage. [3]

Early History of the Savige family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Savige research. Another 116 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1177, 1358, 1410, 1400, 1402, 1403, 1404, 1382, 1386, 1385, 1390, 1391, 1401, 1402, 1404, 1393, 1396, 1402, 1406, 1463, 1507, 1603, 1654, 1628, 1694, 1608, 1682, 1635, 1519, 1176, 1760, 1843 and are included under the topic Early Savige History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Savige Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Savige are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Savige include Savage, Sauvage, Savidge, Savadge and others.

Early Notables of the Savige family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Arnold Savage of Bobbing, Kent (1358-1410), the English Speaker of the House of Commons (1400-1402) and (1403-1404), a Knight of the Shire of Kent who was referred to as "the great comprehensive symbol of the English people", appointed Sheriff of Kent for 1382 and 1386, knighted in 1385, elected knight of the shire (MP) for Kent in 1390, 1391, 1401, 1402 and 1404, being elected speaker twice, constable of Queenborough castle from 1393 to...
Another 83 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Savige Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Savige family to Ireland

Some of the Savige family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 162 words (12 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Savige migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Savige Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • John Savige, aged 19, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship "Adelaide" [4]

Contemporary Notables of the name Savige (post 1700) +

  • Lieutenant-General Sir Stanley George Savige (1890-1954), Australian Director-General of Demobilisation from 1945 to 1946 [5]


The Savige Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: A te pro te
Motto Translation: From thee, for thee.


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ South Australian Register Tuesday 3 February 1852. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) ADELAIDE 1852. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/adelaide1852.shtml
  5. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2011, August 30) Stanley Savige. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Savige/Sir_Stanley_George/Australia.html


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