Savage History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Savage family

The surname Savage was first found in " Normandy and England, which implied, perhaps, a roughness of manners." [1] John Sauuage, was a witness in 1222, James Seavage was married in Edinburgh in 1629, and John Savadge appears in the toun of Sanquhar in 1641. [2]

Selvach (died 729), was king of Scottish Dalriada and was probably a younger son of Fearchair Fada (the Long.) [3]

Early History of the Savage family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Savage research. Another 116 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1177 and are included under the topic Early Savage History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Savage Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Savage, Sauvage, Savidge, Savadge and others.

Early Notables of the Savage family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Savage Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Savage World Ranking

In the United States, the name Savage is the 582nd most popular surname with an estimated 49,740 people with that name. [4] However, in Canada, the name Savage is ranked the 769th most popular surname with an estimated 6,961 people with that name. [5] And in Quebec, Canada, the name Savage is the 983rd popular surname. [6] Australia ranks Savage as 461st with 8,251 people. [7] New Zealand ranks Savage as 338th with 1,875 people. [8] The United Kingdom ranks Savage as 329th with 18,575 people. [9]

Ireland Migration of the Savage family to Ireland

Some of the Savage family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 74 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Savage migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Savage Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Thomas Savage who settled in Virginia in 1607
  • Richard Savage, who arrived in Jamestown, Va in 1607 [10]
  • Ann Savage, who arrived in Virginia in 1621 [10]
  • Ann, Frank, Mart, Thomas Savage, who settled in Virginia in 1635
  • Fr Savage, who arrived in Virginia in 1635 [10]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Savage Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Eliza Savage, who landed in Virginia in 1701 [10]
  • Richard Savage, who arrived in Virginia in 1703 [10]
  • Eliz Savage, who landed in Virginia in 1704 [10]
  • David Savage, who arrived in Virginia in 1714 [10]
  • John Savage, who landed in New England in 1716 [10]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Savage Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • James R Savage, who landed in America in 1801 [10]
  • Patrick D Savage, aged 25, who arrived in Maryland in 1812 [10]
  • Crosfield Savage, aged 22, who landed in New York in 1812 [10]
  • Patrick Savage, who arrived in Louisiana in 1824 [10]
  • Anthony Savage, who landed in New York in 1827 [10]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Savage migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Savage Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Job Savage, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • Matthew Savage, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • John Savage, aged 40, who arrived in Fort Cumberland, Nova Scotia in 1774
  • John Savage with his wife and children settled in Fort Cumberland Nova Scotia in 1774
  • Mr. Abraham Savage U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway, [Shelbourne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 348 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York, USA [11]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Savage Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Mary Savage, aged 21, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the brig "William" from Cork, Ireland
  • George Savage, aged 22, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the brig "Ugoni" from Belfast, Ireland
  • Jeremiah Savage, aged 22, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834 aboard the brig "Levant Star" from Cork, Ireland
  • Jane Savage, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Leslie Gault" in 1834
  • James Savage a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Leslie Gault" in 1834
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Australia Savage migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Savage Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Jonathan Savage, English convict from Cumberland, who was transported aboard the "Asia" on September 3rd, 1820, settling in New South Wales, Australia [12]
  • Patrick Savage Mr. settled in New South Wales, Australia in 1823 [13]
  • Mr. Thomas Savage, British Convict who was convicted in Southampton, Hampshire, England for 14 years, transported aboard the "Earl St Vincent" on 20th April 1826, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [13]
  • Miss Bridget Savage, (b. 1806), aged 20, Irish laundress who was convicted in Dublin, Ireland for 7 years for shop lifting, transported aboard the "Brothers" on 3rd October 1826, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [14]
  • Mrs. Mary Savage, (b. 1795), aged 31, Irish country servant who was convicted in County Tyrone, Ireland for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Brothers" on 3rd October 1826, arriving in New South Wales, Australia, listed as having 1 child [14]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Savage migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Savage Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • John Savage, aged 28, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Seringapatam" in 1856
  • Julia Savage, aged 26, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Seringapatam" in 1856
  • Mr. Savage, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Lord Ashley" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 14th October 1858 [15]
  • Child Savage, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Lord Ashley" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 14th October 1858 [15]
  • Mr. John Savage, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Nourmahal" arriving in Dunedin, Otaga, South Island, New Zealand on 5th May 1858 [15]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

West Indies Savage migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [16]
Savage Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • Mr. Edward Savage, (b. 1614), aged 20, British settler travelling from London, UK arriving in St Christopher (St. Kitts) on 5th January 1634 [10]
  • Mr. Robert Savage, (b. 1614), aged 21, British settler travelling from London, England aboard the ship "Peter Bonaventure" arriving in Barbados and St Christopher (Saint Kitts) in 1635 [17]
  • Robert Savage, aged 21, who landed in Barbados in 1635 [10]
  • Thomas Savage, aged 24, who landed in Barbados in 1684 [10]

Contemporary Notables of the name Savage (post 1700) +

  • Augustus Alexander "Gus" Savage (1925-2015), American politician, Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Illinois (1981-1993)
  • Henry Wilson Savage (1859-1927), American theatrical manager
  • John Savage (b. 1949), born John Youngs, an American Genie Award nominated actor, best known for his roles in The Deer Hunter (1978), Hair (1979) and The Godfather: Part III (1990)
  • Arthur William Savage (1857-1938), American businessman, inventor and explorer, founder of Savage Arms in 1894, best known for producing the Savage Model 99
  • Adam Whitney Savage (b. 1967), American two-time Primetime Emmy Award nominated industrial design and special effects designer/fabricator
  • Fredrick Aaron "Fred" Savage (b. 1976), American two-time Emmy Award and Golden Globe nominated, four-time Young Artist Award winning actor, director and producer of television and film, best known for his role as Kevin Arnold in the American television series The Wonder Years
  • Leonard Jimmie Savage (1917-1971), American mathematician and statistician
  • Andrea Savage (b. 1973), American actress
  • Eugene Francis Savage (1883-1978), American sculptor best known for the Bailey Fountain in Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn, New York
  • Ann Savage (1921-2008), American film and television actress
  • ... (Another 81 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMAS Sydney II
  • Mr. Leonard Roydon Savage (1921-1941), Australian Stoker from East Malvern, Victoria, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [18]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Edwin J Savage (b. 1898), English Chief Engine Room Artificer serving for the Royal Navy from Epsom, Surrey, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [19]
HMS Royal Oak
  • William John Bellas Savage (d. 1939), British Boy 1st Class with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk; he died in the sinking [20]
  • Clarence Henry Savage (d. 1939), British Able Seaman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk; he died in the sinking [20]
RMS Lusitania
  • Mr. Frank Savage, English Fireman from Liverpool, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [21]
RMS Titanic
  • Mr. Charles J. Savage, aged 23, English Saloon Steward from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and survived the sinking by escaping in life boat 11 [22]
USS Arizona
  • Mr. Walter Samuel Savage Jr., American Ensign from Louisiana, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [23]


The Savage Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: A te pro te
Motto Translation: From thee, for thee.


Suggested Readings for the name Savage +

  • America's First Family, the Savages of Virginia by August Burgahrd.
  • Savage-Stillman-Rogers-Lindsey-Dever and Related Families with Magna Carta and Royal Lines by Myrtle Savage Rhoades.
  • We Are the Savages: Descendants of Ensign Thomas Savage of Jamestown by Jacob Cochran Savage.

  1. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  3. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  4. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  5. ^ https://forebears.io/surnames/
  6. ^ https://statistique.quebec.ca/fr/document/noms-de-famille-au-quebec/tableau/les-1-000-premiers-noms-de-famille-selon-le-rang-quebec
  7. ^ https://forebears.io/australia/surnames
  8. ^ https://forebears.io/new-zealand/surnames
  9. ^ https://www.surnamemap.eu/unitedkingdom/surnames_ranking.php?p=10
  10. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  11. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  12. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Asia 1 voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1820 with 192 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/asia/1820
  13. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 14th September 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/earl-st-vincent
  14. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 3rd November 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/brothers
  15. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  16. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  17. ^ Pilgrim Ship Lists Early 1600's retrieved 23rd September 2021. (Retrieved from https://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/shiplist.htm)
  18. ^ HMAS Sydney II, Finding Sydney Foundation - Roll of Honour. (Retrieved 2014, April 24) . Retrieved from http://www.findingsydney.com/roll.asp
  19. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm
  20. ^ Ships hit by U-boats crew list HMS Royal Oak (08) - (Retrieved 2018 February, 9th) - retrieved from https://uboat.net/allies/merchants/crews/ship68.html
  21. ^ Lusitania Passenger List - The Lusitania Resource. (Retrieved 2014, March 7) . Retrieved from http://www.rmslusitania.info/lusitania-passenger-list/
  22. ^ Titanic Passenger List - Titanic Facts. (Retrieved 2016, July 13) . Retrieved from http://www.titanicfacts.net/titanic-passenger-list.html
  23. ^ Pearl Harbour: USS Arizona Casualties List Pearl Harbour December 7, 1941. (Retrieved 2018, July 31st). Retrieved from http://pearl-harbor.com/arizona/casualtylist.html


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