Sabins History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The history of the name Sabins begins with the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. It is derived from Sabinus and Sabine; these are the masculine and feminine forms of the name, respectively. The personal name is derived from the Sabines, a people who lived in the Appenines northwest of Rome. By the third century BC the Sabines had become fully Romanized. There were three saints named Sabinus and one named Sabine. "In England, the woman's name was much the more common." [1]

Another source confirms that the name was "originally Sabinus, a Roman personal name, implying a descent from the Sabine nation. Sabina, its feminine, is still used as a baptismal name." [2]

And another source has a slightly different version, "A statue of 'Sabinus, planter of the vines' (the supposed eponymous of the Sabines), was among those remarked by Æneas when he entered the palace of Latinus." [3]

Early Origins of the Sabins family

The surname Sabins was first found in Norfolk where the first record of the name was in the Latin form Sabina (1186-1210) and then later in the Curia Regis Rolls for Kent and Surrey in 1220. Later in Huntingdonshire, Rogerus filius Sabini was registered there in 1252. Richard Sabin was found in the Assize Rolls for Warwickshire in 1221 and John Sabine was recorded in the Hundredorum Rolls for Cheshire in 1279. [1]

The same rolls also included Alexander Sabine in Essex. [4]

In Somerset, ancient English rolls listed Sabyna Vesy and William Sabin, 1 Edward III (during the first year of King Edward III's reign). [5]

Laurence William Savona (fl. 1485), was a Franciscan of London who graduated D.D. at Cambridge, where in 1478 he wrote his 'Margarita Eloquentiae' in three books. [6]

Early History of the Sabins family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Sabins research. Another 121 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1758, 1791, 1662, 1739, 1689, 1689, 1691, 1695, 1704, 1730 and 1739 are included under the topic Early Sabins History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Sabins Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Sabins has been recorded under many different variations, including Sabine, Sabbe, Sabin, Sabyn, Sabben, Saban and many more.

Early Notables of the Sabins family (pre 1700)

Notables of the family at this time include General Joseph Sabine (c. 1662-1739), British Army officer who came of a family settled at Patricksbourne in Kent; his grandfather, Avery Sabine, was an alderman of Canterbury. Joseph was appointed captain lieutenant to Sir Henry Ingoldsby's regiment of foot on 8 March 1689, captain of the grenadier company before 18 Oct. 1689, major of...
Another 61 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Sabins Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Sabins family

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Sabins or a variant listed above: Robert Sabin settled in Virginia in 1623; Susan and Thomas Sabin settled in Virginia in 1648; Thomas Sabin settled in Antigua in 1774; William Sabin settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1630.



  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  6. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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