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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The ancestors of the name Rudge date back to the days of the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. The name is derived from their residence near a ridge. Also, some examples of the name are of nickname derivation. This makes Rudge a classic example of an English polygenetic surname, which is a surname that was developed in a number of different locations and adopted by various families independently. The local variant of the surname is derived from the Old English word hrycg, which means ridge. In Old English, thish word became rugge, regge, and rigge in various dialects of the language. The surname Rudge is derived from the rugge variant of the word. The nickname variant is derived from the Anglo French word rugge (rouge in Modern French) which means red, and would have been the nickname of someone with brilliant red hair.

Rudge Early Origins



The surname Rudge was first found in Shropshire at Rudge, a township, in the parish of Pattingham. "The surname is doubtless derived from a township in Shropshire so called. " [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
The place name was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Rigge [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
and was derived from the Old English word "hrycg" which means "place at the ridge." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
There are few other places named Rudge in Britain, specifically in the counties Devon, Wiltshire and Somerset and all are very small locals and have remained small through the centuries. An early member of the family was John de Rugge, of Seysdon, Staffordshire who was living, 17 Edward II.

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Rudge Spelling Variations


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Rudge Spelling Variations



Rudge has been spelled many different ways, including Before English spelling became standardized over the last few hundred years, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. As the English language changed in the Middle Ages, absorbing pieces of Latin and French, as well as other languages, the spelling of people's names also changed considerably, even over a single lifetime. Rudge, Ruidge, Roidge, Rutdge, Rutge, Rudych, Rutch, Rutche, Ruitge and many more.

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Rudge Early History


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Rudge Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Rudge research. Another 193 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1320 and 1637 are included under the topic Early Rudge History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Rudge Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Rudge Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Rudge Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



In an attempt to escape the chaos experienced in England, many English families boarded overcrowded and diseased ships sailing for the shores of North America and other British colonies. Those families hardy enough, and lucky enough, to make the passage intact were rewarded with land and a social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families became important contributors to the young colonies in which they settled. Early immigration and passenger lists have documented some of the first Rudges to arrive on North American shores:

Rudge Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Joe Rudge, who settled in Barbados in 1635
  • Jo Rudge, aged 42, arrived in Barbados in 1635
  • Thomas Rudge, who settled in New York in 1679

Rudge Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • George and John Rudge, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1820

Rudge Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Albert Rudge, aged 2, who landed in America from Belston, England, in 1907
  • Charles Henry Rudge, aged 17, who landed in America from Bristol, England, in 1909
  • Edward Rudge, aged 40, who emigrated to the United States from Sandown, England, in 1912
  • Edwyn Ross Rudge, aged 38, who settled in America from Auckland, New Zealand, in 1920
  • Amelia Rudge, aged 55, who settled in America from Birmingham, England, in 1921

Rudge Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Henry Rudge, English convict from Warwick, who was transported aboard the "Agincourt" on July 6, 1844, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 24) Agincourt voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1844 with 226 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/agincourt/1844

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Contemporary Notables of the name Rudge (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Rudge (post 1700)



  • William Edwin Rudge (1876-1931), American publisher and printer
  • Olga Rudge (1895-1996), American-born concert violinist and long-time mistress of the poet Ezra Pound
  • Myles Peter Carpenter Rudge (1926-2007), English songwriter, best known for writing the lyrics for "Hole in the Ground" and "Right Said Fred," both British Top Ten chart hits in 1962
  • Selena Rudge (b. 1975), English female rugby union player who played for England at the 2006 Women's Rugby World Cup
  • Mary Rudge (1842-1919), English female chess master
  • Edward John Rudge M.A. (1792-1861), English barrister and antiquary, Fellow of the Royal Society in 1847, son of Edward Rudge
  • Edward Rudge (1763-1846), English botanist and antiquary
  • Lloyd Maurice Rudge (1934-1990), English cricketer who played a single first-class match for Worcestershire
  • William Douglas "Will" Rudge (b. 1983), English cricketer
  • John Robert Rudge (b. 1944), English professional footballer and a football manager who played from 1961 to 1977 and managed Port Vale from 1983 to 1999
  • ... (Another 6 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: In cruce fides
Motto Translation: Faith in the cross.


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Rudge Family Crest Products


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Rudge Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  4. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 24) Agincourt voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1844 with 226 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/agincourt/1844

Other References

  1. Shaw, William A. Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, Ireland and Knights Bachelors 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print. (ISBN 080630443X).
  2. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  3. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
  4. Humble, Richard. The Fall of Saxon England. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-987-8).
  5. Reaney P.H and R.M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X).
  6. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  7. Lennard, Reginald. Rural England 1086-1135 A Study of Social and Agrarian Conditions. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. Print.
  8. Thirsk, Joan. The Agrarian History of England and Wales. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 7 Volumes. Print.
  9. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  10. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
  11. ...

The Rudge Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Rudge Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 5 November 2015 at 16:12.

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