Robison History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The saga of the Robison family name begins among the people of an ancient Scottish tribe called the Picts. The Robison name is derived from the personal name Robert. This name is composed of the old English elements hroth, which means fame, and berht, which means bright. Although this Clan had the early appearance of being English, the Robsons were one of the four principal Clans of the North Tyne area just south of the Scottish Border in the sixteenth century. Their progenitor was Robert, the second son of George Gunn, the Crowner of Scotland. The Gunn Clan territories were in northern Scotland and they were of Norse origin together with their overlords, the Sinclairs.

Early Origins of the Robison family

The surname Robison was first found in Northumberland, where the name was quite distinct from both Robinson and Robertson, although in early records of the Clan the Robson name was frequently spelled Robison, literally Robi's son.

" Northumberland is the great home of the Robsons, particularly the district of North Tyne, where they have been established since the 12th or 13th century (C.). They formed one of the four principal clans of North Tyne in the 16th century, and were the hereditary foes of the Armstrongs of Liddesdale on the Scottish side of the border. Though scattered over Northumberland, the Robsons are still numerous in North Tyne; and in the parish of Falstone, where as 'lairds' they have held property for some 400 years, they are yet well represented. The name has obtained but little hold across the border, but it has extended southward in force into the county of Durham; it reaches Yorkshire in diminished numbers, and dies out in Lincolnshire." [1]

In Scotland, the name first appears soon after the death of George Gunn in the 15th century: Patrick Robson was recorded in 1436, Donald Robson in 1446 and Wyllie Robyson witnessed a feud in 1476. From this point the Clan flourished on both sides of the border, with the Chiefly branch on the Scottish side. It is not altogether surprising that with this Clan straddling the England- Scotland border a John and Edward Robison were charged with defrauding the king's customs in 1524. [2]

"The English Robsons formed one of the four principal clans of North Tyne in the sixteenth century. In Bullein's Dialogue they are described as 'a wight riding sirname, good honest men and true, saving a little shifting for their living.' " [2]

Early History of the Robison family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Robison research. Another 331 words (24 lines of text) covering the years 1567, 1550, 1600, 1587, 1590, 1597, 1604, 1633, 1654, 1650, 1598, 1638, 1598, 1613, 1615, 1616, 1619, 1629, 1620, 1623 and are included under the topic Early Robison History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Robison Spelling Variations

Repeated and inaccurate translation of Scottish names from Gaelic to English and back resulted in a wide variety of spelling variations with single names. Robison has appeared Robson, Robison, Robeson, Robisonn and others.

Early Notables of the Robison family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the Clan at this time was Charles Robson (1598-1638), English divine, first chaplain at Aleppo, of Cumberland parentage, the son of Thomas Robson, master of the Free School of Carlisle. "Born in 1598, having entered Queen's College, Oxford, as batler at Easter 1613, he matriculated thence on 5 May 1615, aged 17. He graduated B.A...
Another 57 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Robison Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Robison family to Ireland

Some of the Robison family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 58 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Robison migration to the United States +

Many Scottish families suffered enormous hardships and were compelled to leave their country of birth. They traveled to Ireland and Australia, but mostly to the colonies of North America, where many found the freedom and opportunity they sought. It was not without a fight, though, as many were forced to stand up and defend their freedom in the American War of Independence. The ancestors of these Scots abroad have rediscovered their heritage in the last century through the Clan societies and other organizations that have sprung up across North America. Immigration and passenger ship lists show some important early immigrants bearing the name Robison:

Robison Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Giles Robison, who arrived in Virginia in 1656 [3]
  • Richard Robison, who landed in Virginia in 1656 [3]
  • Jane Robison, who settled in Nevis in 1663
  • Penelope Robison, who arrived in Maryland in 1679 [3]
  • Joseph Robison, who arrived in Maryland in 1680 [3]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Robison Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Nathaniel Robison, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1746 [3]
Robison Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • John Robison, who landed in Washington County, Pennsylvania in 1802 [3]
  • Andrew Robison, who landed in New York, NY in 1811 [3]
  • William Robison, aged 19, who landed in New York, NY in 1812-1813 [3]
  • George Robison, who landed in Somerset County, Pennsylvania in 1845 [3]
  • D N Robison, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851 [3]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Robison Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Chas. H. Robison, aged 51, who settled in America from London, in 1900
  • Jack Robison, who landed in America, in 1903
  • Ann J. Robison, who landed in America, in 1903
  • Robert Robison, aged 23, who settled in America, in 1903
  • Virginia Susan Robison, aged 48, who immigrated to America, in 1905
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Robison migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Robison Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • David Robison, aged 26, a carpenter, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Highlander" in 1834
  • Ann Robison, aged 24, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Highlander" in 1834

New Zealand Robison migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Robison Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Hugh Robison, aged 24, who arrived in Otago aboard the ship "Lady Nugent" in 1850
  • Hugh Robison, aged 28, a merchant, who arrived in Otago aboard the ship "Lady Nugent" in 1850

Contemporary Notables of the name Robison (post 1700) +

  • Stephanie Robison (b. 1976), born Stephanie Robison Baggs, American artist
  • Willard Robison (1894-1968), American composer
  • Admiral Samuel Shelburne Robison (1867-1952), American Superintendent of the United States Naval Academy
  • Paula Robison, American flutist
  • Mary Robison (b. 1949), American short story writer and novelist
  • Olin Clyde Robison (b. 1936), American academic, president of Middlebury College
  • Sarah Louisa Yates Robison (1866-1946), American 7th President of the Relief Society of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (1928 to 1939)
  • John Elder Robison (b. 1957), American author
  • James Robison (b. 1943), American televangelist
  • James Robison (b. 1946), American novelist, short story writer, poet and screenwriter
  • ... (Another 30 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)


The Robison Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Justus esto et non metue
Motto Translation: Be just and fear not


  1. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  2. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate