Pulford History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Anglo-Saxon name Pulford comes from when the family resided in the parish of Pulford, in Cheshire, a few miles from the City of Chester. The place-name is derived from the Old English words pul or pol, which mean pool, and ford, which is a place where a river may be crossed by wading. The place-name as a whole means "river crossing near a pool." The place-name was recorded as Pulford in the Domesday Book, [1] compiled in 1086. The surname means "one who comes from Pulford," or alternatively "dweller by the river crossing where there is a pool."

Early Origins of the Pulford family

The surname Pulford was first found in Cheshire where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Britain to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

Early History of the Pulford family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Pulford research. Another 83 words (6 lines of text) covering the year 1190 is included under the topic Early Pulford History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Pulford Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, French and other languages became incorporated into English through the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Pulford include Pulford, Pullford and others.

Early Notables of the Pulford family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Pulford Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Pulford migration to the United States +

A great wave of immigration to the New World was the result of the enormous political and religious disarray that struck England at that time. Families left for the New World in extremely large numbers. The long journey was the end of many immigrants and many more arrived sick and starving. Still, those who made it were rewarded with an opportunity far greater than they had known at home in England. These emigrant families went on to make significant contributions to these emerging colonies in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers carried this name or one of its variants:

Pulford Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Brian Pulford, who settled in Virginia in 1697
Pulford Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Thomas Pulford, a bonded passenger, who arrived in America in 1751
Pulford Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Henry Pulford, who was naturalized in Ohio in 1876

Canada Pulford migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Pulford Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Francis W. Pulford and George Pulford, who were on record in the census of Ontario, Canada in 1871

Australia Pulford migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Pulford Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • George Pulford, aged 38, a carpenter, who arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship "Cheapside" [2]
  • John Pulford, aged 25, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship "Duchess of Northumberland"
  • Edwin Pulford, aged 36, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship "Blundell"
  • Susanna Pulford, aged 15, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship "Blundell"

New Zealand Pulford migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Pulford Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James Pulford, (b. 1854), aged 25, British settler travelling from Plymouth aboard the ship "Stad Haarlem" arriving in Lyttleton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 14th April 1879 [3]
  • Mr. Walter Pulford, (b. 1858), aged 21, British settler travelling from Plymouth aboard the ship "Stad Haarlem" arriving in Lyttleton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 14th April 1879 [3]
  • Mr. William Pulford, (b. 1859), aged 20, British settler travelling from Plymouth aboard the ship "Stad Haarlem" arriving in Lyttleton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 14th April 1879 [3]

West Indies Pulford migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [4]
Pulford Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • William Pulford, who arrived in Barbados in 1664

Contemporary Notables of the name Pulford (post 1700) +

  • David Pulford, American politician, Member of South Dakota State House of Representatives, 1933-60 [5]
  • Air Vice-Marshal Andrew Douglas Pulford CBE RAF, British senior Royal Air Force officer
  • Jaala Pulford (b. 1974), Australian politician
  • Katherine Louise Pulford (b. 1980), New Zealand cricketer
  • Robert Jesse Pulford (b. 1936), retired Canadian professional ice hockey forward
  • Ernest Harvey Pulford (1875-1940), Canadian athlete, who was a national champion in several sports

HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. Pulford, British Petty Officer Writer, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [6]


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The CHEAPSIDE 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Cheapside.htm
  3. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  4. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  5. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 8) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  6. ^ HMS Prince of Wales Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listprincecrew.html


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