Pinner History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Pinner is an old Anglo-Saxon name that was given to a person who was a person who worked as the Pinder which referred to the individual who impounded stray cattle. During the Middle Ages there was rampant theft of livestock, which made the Pinder a very important member of the community. [1] The variant Pounder was used interchangeably with Pinder. [2]

Early Origins of the Pinner family

The surname Pinner was first found in Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire where the name has appeared "for six centuries, and occurs in both counties as Le Pinder in the reign of Edward I." [3]

"The Pindar (or Pinder) of Wakefield (George a Green) is the subject of one of the Robin Hood ballads. "

"She doth not only think of lusty Robin Hood, But of his merry man, the Pindar of the Town Of Wakefield, George a Greene.- Drayton, Poly-Olbion, xxviii, 70-2." [2]

Interestingly, the Hundredorum Rolls had only two entries for the family and both were in the aforementioned counties: Hugh le Pinder, Lincolnshire; and Walter le Pinder, Nottinghamshire. [1] The Excerpta e Rotulis Finium in Turri Londinensi listed John le Pindere while the Writs of Parliament c. 1300 listed Henry le Pynder

Early History of the Pinner family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Pinner research. Another 132 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1538, 1749, 1565, 1650, 1693, 1694, 1680 and 1705 are included under the topic Early Pinner History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Pinner Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Pinner has been recorded under many different variations, including Pinder, Pynder, Pyndar, Pendar, Pindar, Pinner, Pinter, Pender and many more.

Early Notables of the Pinner family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Sir Paul Pindar (c. 1565-1650), English diplomat, born at Wellingborough, Northamptonshire. "The family is said to have been long resident in Wellingborough." [4] Sir Peter Pindar, of Idinshaw...
Another 33 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Pinner Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Pinner Ranking

In the United States, the name Pinner is the 16,779th most popular surname with an estimated 2,487 people with that name. [5]


United States Pinner migration to the United States +

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Pinner or a variant listed above:

Pinner Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Richard Pinner, who arrived in Maryland in 1637 [6]
  • James Pinner who settled in Virginia in 1643
  • James Pinner, who arrived in Virginia in 1643 [6]
  • Thomas Pinner, who arrived in Maryland in 1658 [6]
  • Roger Pinner, who landed in Virginia in 1661 [6]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Australia Pinner migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Pinner Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Henry Pinner, English convict who was convicted in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England for 10 years, transported aboard the "Canton" on 20th September 1839, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [7]
  • Mr. Richard Pinner, English convict who was convicted in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Emerald Isle" on 25th June 1842, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [8]

New Zealand Pinner migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Pinner Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Miss Charlotte Pinner, (b. 1831), aged 26, British servant travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Glentanner" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 3rd October 1857 [9]

West Indies Pinner migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [10]
Pinner Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • John Pinner, who settled in Barbados in 1669

Contemporary Notables of the name Pinner (post 1700) +

  • Artose Deonce Pinner (b. 1978), American football running back
  • John B. Pinner, American Democratic Party politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1916, 1924 [11]
  • William Gladstone Pinner (1877-1944), English cricketer from Wednesbury, Staffordshire
  • Michael John Pinner (b. 1934), English amateur football goalkeeper at the 1960 Summer Olympics
  • Harry Pinner (b. 1956), English former professional rugby league footballer
  • George Pinner, British field hockey reserve goalkeeper at the 2012 Olympic Games
  • Ulrich Pinner (b. 1954), German retired professional tennis player, ranked World No. 22 in July 1979
  • Adolf Pinner (1842-1909), German chemist, eponym of the Pinner reaction

Empress of Ireland
  • Mr. Charles Pinner, British Assistant Steward from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland (1914) and survived the sinking [12]


The Pinner Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ex fide fortis
Motto Translation: Strong though faith.


  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  3. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  4. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  5. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  6. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  7. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 17th December 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/canton
  8. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 27th March 2022). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/emily
  9. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  10. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  11. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 21) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  12. ^ Commemoration Empress of Ireland 2014. (Retrieved 2014, June 17) . Retrieved from http://www.empress2014.ca/seclangen/listepsc1.html


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