Petch History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Petch was carried to England in the enormous movement of people that followed the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Petch family lived in Kent. It is thought that Peachy is of topographical origin, distinguishing a bearer who lived near a peach tree, sold peaches, or was associated with the fruit in some other way. In French it is written peche, and the addition of the letter y on to the end of the name is probably the result of its Anglicization.

Early Origins of the Petch family

The surname Petch was first found in Kent where the name descends from the baronial name Peche, Latinized De Peccato. One of the oldest recordings of the name is found in a stained glass window at Lullingstone in Kent. [1]

Early History of the Petch family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Petch research. Another 111 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1164, 1671, 1737, 1736, 1723, 1808 and 1794 are included under the topic Early Petch History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Petch Spelling Variations

Endless spelling variations are a prevailing characteristic of Norman surnames. Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules, and the introduction of Norman French added an unfamiliar ingredient to the English linguistic stew. French and Latin, the languages of the court, also influenced spellings. Finally, Medieval scribes generally spelled words according to how they sounded, so one person was often referred to by different spellings in different documents. The name has been spelled Peachy, Peach, Peache, Peachee, Peachey, Peche and many more.

Early Notables of the Petch family (pre 1700)

Another 31 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Petch Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Petch migration to Australia

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Petch Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Thomas Petch, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Orleana" in 1840 [2]
  • Alfred Petch, aged 23, who arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship "Ostrich" [3]
  • John Petch, aged 34, a bricklayer, who arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship "Navarino" [4]

Petch migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Petch Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • George Petch, aged 35, a farm labourer, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Collingwood" in 1875
  • Eliza Petch, aged 38, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Collingwood" in 1875
  • William Petch, aged 10, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Collingwood" in 1875
  • Harry Petch, aged 8, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Collingwood" in 1875
  • Harriet Petch, aged 1, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Collingwood" in 1875
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Petch family

HMS Hood
  • Mr. Roy V Petch (b. 1921), English Able Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Hastings, Sussex, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [5]

Citations

  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) ORLEANA 1840. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1840Orleana.htm
  3. ^ South Australian Register Saturday 22nd July 1854. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Ostrich 1854. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/ostrich1854.shtml
  4. ^ South Australian Register Friday 22nd February 1856. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Navarino 1856. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/navarino1856.shtml.
  5. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm
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