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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


Naliveray is an ancient Norman name that arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name Naliveray comes from the name Mauleverer, which at the time of the Norman Conquest, was the name of a noble Norman family.

Naliveray Early Origins



The surname Naliveray was first found in the North Riding of Yorkshire where they held a family seat at Arncliffe Hall. They are descended from Sir Richard Mauleverer who accompanied Duke William of Normandy in his conquest of England in 1066 A.D. He was appointed master of the forests, chases, and parks north of the river Trent. Allerton-Mauleverer in the West Riding of Yorkshire was an ancient family seat. "This place obtained its distinguishing name from the family of Mauleverer, one of whom, named Richard, in the reign of Henry II. founded here an alien priory of Benedictine monks." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
"The lands [of Ingleby Arncliffe in the West Riding of Yorkshire] are chiefly the property of William Mauleverer, Esq., the descendant of the Norman Baron who came over with the Conqueror from Normandy, and whose family have continued here since that period." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Naliveray Spelling Variations


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Naliveray Spelling Variations



A multitude of spelling variations characterize Norman surnames. Many variations occurred because Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England also had a pronounced effect, as did the court languages of Latin and French. Therefore, one person was often referred to by several different spellings in a single lifetime. The various spellings include Mauleverer, Malouverer, Maleverer, Malleverer and many more.

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Naliveray Early History


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Naliveray Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Naliveray research. Another 203 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1599, 1655, 1640 and 1649 are included under the topic Early Naliveray History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Naliveray Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Naliveray Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 42 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Naliveray Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Many English families left England, to avoid the chaos of their homeland and migrated to the many British colonies abroad. Although the conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and some travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute, once in the colonies, many of the families prospered and made valuable contributions to the cultures of what would become the United States and Canada. Research into the origins of individual families in North America has revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Naliveray or a variant listed above: Jonathon Mauleverer who landed in North America in 1700.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: En dieu ma foy
Motto Translation: My faith is in God.


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Naliveray Family Crest Products


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Naliveray Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Foster, Joseph. Dictionary of Heraldry Feudal Coats of Arms and Pedigrees. London: Bracken Books, 1989. Print. (ISBN 1-85170-309-8).
  2. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
  3. Library of Congress. American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1967. Print.
  4. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
  5. Holt, J.C. Ed. Domesday Studies. Woodbridge: Boydell, 1987. Print. (ISBN 0-85115-477-8).
  6. Bradford, William. History of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647 Edited by Samuel Eliot Morrison 2 Volumes. New York: Russell and Russell, 1968. Print.
  7. Humble, Richard. The Fall of Saxon England. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-987-8).
  8. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  9. Reaney P.H and R.M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X).
  10. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  11. ...

The Naliveray Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Naliveray Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 9 March 2016 at 13:36.

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