Musscampe History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Musscampe is a name of ancient Norman origin. It arrived in England with the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Musscampe family lived in Muscamp, Normandy, the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. [1]

Early Origins of the Musscampe family

The surname Musscampe was first found in Lincolnshire Roger, Baron Muschamp held Wilgebi in 1086 and Robert de Muscam his son, Seneschal to Gilbert de Gand, had issue, Hugh, a benefactor of Nostel Priory in the time of Hen. I. [2]

This Hugh, who appears in the Liber Niger as a landowner in York and Lincoln, has left his name to Muskam in Nottinghamshire, which he held of Henry Murdac, Archbishop of York. He had a park, and no doubt a residence, at South Muskam, where some of his land was granted to Rufiford Abbey, his last gift being made " when he rendered himself to the fellowship of the monks." [3] His son and heir Robert confirmed his grants, and completed the church he had commenced building at Rufford. Robert's three sons, Ralph, Robert, and Andrew, all died s. p., and in 1223 Ralph de Gresley entered into possession of their inheritance as the husband of their sister Isabel. At North Muskam, Thomas de Muschamp held of Robert de Everingham's fee in 1165 [3], and was succeeded there by at least four generations of descendants, but Thoroton only carries the pedigree down to 1323, when the manor was disposed of by Thomas de Muschamp. [2]

A more important branch of the family was seated in Northumberland, where Reginald de Muscamp is mentioned in 1130 (Rot. Pip.). Robert de Muscamp (perhaps his brother) received from Henry I. a barony of four knights' fees in Bambroughshire, and chose Wooler-a small market town to the east of the Cheviots-as the head of his honour. His son Thomas, who joined Prince Henry's rebellion in 11 72, and married Maud de Vesci, the daughter of the Lord of Alnwick, was the grandfather of another Robert, considered the mightiest Baron in the North of England. [2]

A William de Muschampe of Barmoor Castle (about a mile W. from Lowick) is mentioned in 1272 : and his descendant George Muschampe was twice High Sheriff of Northumberland under Queen Elizabeth.

North Middleton is of particular importance to the family. "This place was, with South Middleton, anciently the estate of Robert de Muschamp, and a member of his lordship of Wooler: the manor became divided into North and South about the end of the reign of Henry III., and in the time of Henry IV. the former part was held by John de Farmelawe." [4]

Geoffrey de Muschamp (d. 1208), "Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, was probably a member of the family of Muschamp, barons by tenure of Wallovere in Northumberland. Geoffrey was appointed Archdeacon of Cleveland in 1189, after the death of Henry II, and without the knowledge of King Richard. Geoffrey of York had made use of his position as chancellor to affix the late king's seals on his own authority, probably acting on directions given by Henry before his death. He was consecrated by Hubert at Canterbury on 21 June 1198 (his own autograph in the archives of Canterbury). He was present at [King] John's coronation in May 1199 and at the council of Westminster in 1200. In 1204 he appears as a commissioner to decide the suit between the Bishop of Worcester and abbey of Evesham." [5]

Early History of the Musscampe family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Musscampe research. Another 226 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1622, 1630, 1463, 1660 and 1624 are included under the topic Early Musscampe History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Musscampe Spelling Variations

Endless spelling variations are a prevailing characteristic of Norman surnames. Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules, and the introduction of Norman French added an unfamiliar ingredient to the English linguistic stew. French and Latin, the languages of the court, also influenced spellings. Finally, Medieval scribes generally spelled words according to how they sounded, so one person was often referred to by different spellings in different documents. The name has been spelled Muscamp, Muschamp, Muscampe, Mushcamp, Musscamp, Musscampe, Musschampe and many more.

Early Notables of the Musscampe family (pre 1700)

Another 27 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Musscampe Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Musscampe family to Ireland

Some of the Musscampe family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 38 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Musscampe family

To escape the political and religious persecution within England at the time, many English families left for the various British colonies abroad. The voyage was extremely difficult, though, and the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving. But for those who made it, the trip was most often worth it. Many of the families who arrived went on to make valuable contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families reveals a number of immigrants bearing the name Musscampe or a variant listed above: Math Muschamp, who arrived in Virginia in 1664; John Muschamp, who came to Maryland in 1665; Edmond Muschamp, who came to Maryland in 1665; George Muschamp, who arrived in Maryland in 1713.



  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3
  3. ^ Liber Niger Scutarii ("Black Book of the Exchequer"), containing reports by county on feudal holdings in England in 1166 (reign of Henry II)
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  5. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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