Mousson History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The vast movement of people that followed the Norman Conquest of England of 1066 brought the Mousson family name to the British Isles. They lived in Yorkshire. Their name is thought to be derived from the place-name, Moucon, in Normandy, although another account suggests that it is a variation of the French name Musset. Both theories are considered valid, but historians disagree on which applies to individual cases.

Early Origins of the Mousson family

The surname Mousson was first found in Yorkshire where they held a family seat in the large village of Muston in the East Riding of that County shown at the taking of the Domesday Book in 1068 to be held by Gilbert de Ghent (Flanders) from the King. Gilbert held the Manor at that time and, conjecturally, the family are believed to be descended from this Norman noble. The village name Muston or Musson is also believed to be related to a Norman family name of Moucon, and may have been the surname of Gilbert of Ghent (Flanders) or Gand, or a member of his family. Gilbert was one of the most highly honored Barons who assisted Duke William at Hastings in 1066. He became Baron Folkingham, possibly a nephew of Queen Matilda, and held no less than 172 English manors.

Important Dates for the Mousson family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mousson research. Another 184 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1207, 1373, 1094, 1207, 1326, 1473 and 1509 are included under the topic Early Mousson History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mousson Spelling Variations

Anglo-Norman names are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. When the Normans became the ruling people of England in the 11th century, they introduced a new language into a society where the main languages of Old and later Middle English had no definite spelling rules. These languages were more often spoken than written, so they blended freely with one another. Contributing to this mixing of tongues was the fact that medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, ensuring that a person's name would appear differently in nearly every document in which it was recorded. The name has been spelled Muston, Musson, Moucon, Mussen, Mustons, Mussin, Musin, Muson, Musten, Moussen, Mousson, Mussons, Mustain, Mustin and many more.

Early Notables of the Mousson family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Mousson Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mousson migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Mousson Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Eugene Mousson, aged 24, a carpenter, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Soukar" in 1874
  • Elvina Mousson, aged 28, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Soukar" in 1874
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