McKenny History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The McKenny surname in Ireland comes from the Gaelic O Coinnigh, which was an old Irish first name, made popular by a 6th century monk of the name, whose "church of Coinneach" became the name of the town Kilkenny.

Early Origins of the McKenny family

The surname McKenny was first found in counties Galway and Roscommon (Irish: Ros Comáin) located in central Ireland in the province of Connacht.

Early History of the McKenny family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McKenny research. Another 99 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McKenny History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McKenny Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Kenny, O'Kenny, Kenney, Kennie and others.

Early Notables of the McKenny family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early McKenny Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States McKenny migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

McKenny Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • John McKenny, who arrived in Virginia in 1735 [1]
McKenny Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Massias McKenny, aged 56, who landed in New York in 1812 [1]
  • Patrick McKenny, aged 27, who arrived in Mobile County, Ala in 1840 [1]
  • Edward, Hugh, James, Patrick McKenny all, who arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1860
  • Edward McKenny, who landed in Arkansas in 1867 [1]

Canada McKenny migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

McKenny Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Amos McKenny U.E. who settled in Canada c. 1784 [2]
McKenny Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Elenor McKenny, aged 18, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Madawaska" in 1833
  • John McKenny, aged 16, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Ambassador" in 1834
  • Rose McKenny, aged 17, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Ambassador" in 1834
  • William McKenny, aged 26, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Highlander" in 1834

Australia McKenny migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

McKenny Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James McKenny, British convict who was convicted in Parkhurst, Isle of Wight, United Kingdom for 14 years, transported aboard the ""Blenheim"" on 24th July 1850, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) and Norfolk Island, Australia [3]
  • Mr. Jacob Mckenny, (b. 1834), aged 20, Cornish miner, from Redruth, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lady Elgin" arriving in New South Wales, Australia on 4th August 1854 [4]
  • Ellen McKenny, aged 22, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Punjab"
  • John McKenny, aged 21, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Sea Park"
  • Mary McKenny, aged 14, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Bucephalus"
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand McKenny migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

McKenny Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Robert McKENNY, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1844


The McKenny Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Vincit veritas
Motto Translation: Truth conquers.


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  3. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 25th October 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/blenheim
  4. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_nsw_1850_59.pdf


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